Nicomachean ethics

Front Cover
Bobbs-Merrill, 1962 - Philosophy - 316 pages
15 Reviews
Aristotle (384-322BC) is the philosopher who has most influence on the development of western culture, writing on a wide variety of subjects including the natural sciences as well as the more strictly philosophical topics of logic, metaphysics and ethics. To the poet Dante, he was simply 'the master of those who know'.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
5
3 stars
4
2 stars
2
1 star
0

Review: The Nicomachean Ethics

User Review  - Andrew Anony - Goodreads

The introduction goes through the word 'ethics' and how Aristotle meant something different - more about character. Also by happiness he meant something different. There exists an indeterminancy of ... Read full review

Review: The Nicomachean Ethics

User Review  - John Doe - Goodreads

If you are going to walk, you may as well learn to walk in the proper way. If you are going to eat, you may as well learn the art of eating. Which one is the salad fork? Aristotle thinks we achieve ... Read full review

Contents

Book
5
Book Two
33
Book Four
83
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1962)

Aristotle, 384 B.C. - 322 B. C. Aristotle was born at Stagira, in Macedonia, in 384 B.C. At the age of 17, he went to Athens to study at Plato's Academy, where he remained for about 20 years, as a student and then as a teacher. When Plato died in 347 B.C., Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias, was ruler. After Hermias was captured and executed by the Persians in 345 B.C., Aristotle went to Pella, the Macedonian capital, where he became the tutor of the king's young son Alexander, later known as Alexander the Great. In 335, when Alexander became king, Aristotle returned to Athens and established his own school, the Lyceum Aristotle's works were lost in the West after the decline of Rome, but during the 9th Century A.D., Arab scholars introduced Aristotle, in Arabic translation, to the Islamic world. In the 13th Century, the Latin West renewed its interest in Aristotle's work, and Saint Thomas Aquinas found in it a philosophical foundation for Christian thought. The influence of Aristotle's philosophy has been pervasive; it has even helped to shape modern language and common sense. Aristotle died in 322 B.C.

Martin Ostwald is W. R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of Classics at Swarthmore College, Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, and author of "Autonomia: Its Genesis and Early History" (1982).

Bibliographic information