Mr Majeika

Front Cover
Puffin, Jan 1, 1985 - Magic - 94 pages
5 Reviews
As a rule, magic carpets don't turn up in schools, but this is exactly what happens when Class Three's new teacher flies in through the classroom window and lands on the floor with a bump. Mr Majeika can behave just like any ordinary teacher if he wants to, but something has to be done about Hamish Bigmore, the class nuisance, and so he uses a little magic to turn him into a frog. And to everyone's delight it looks as if Hamish will have to remain a frog because Mr Majeika can't remember the spell to turn him back again! With Mr Majeika in charge, suddenly life at school become much more exciting - there's even a magic-carpet ride to Buckingham Palace!

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Review: Mr. Majeika (Mr. Majeika #1)

User Review  - Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance - Goodreads

Class Three's new teacher appears on a magic carpet and the adventures begin. Delightful. Read full review

Review: Mr. Majeika (Mr. Majeika #1)

User Review  - Suzy Platt - Goodreads

My 9 year old son is loving reading this series for his school reading. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
7
Section 3
14
Copyright

8 other sections not shown

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About the author (1985)

Humphrey Carpenter worked at the BBC before becaming a full-time writer in 1975. He was the author of 14 of the well-loved Mr Majeika titles as well as two Shakespeare Without the Boring Bits titles for children. He was also the co-author, with his wife Mari Prichard, of The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature. He was an eminent figure in the world of adult literature and published award-winning biographies including, among others, those of J. R. R Tolkein, C. S. Lewis, W. H. Auden, Benjamin Britten and Spike Milligan. From 1994-1996 he directed the Cheltenham Festival of Literature and for many years he ran a young people's drama group, the Mushy Pea Theatre Company. He wrote plays for radio and theatre and was a regular contributor to the Guardian. Humphrey died in January 2005.

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