How We Know What Isn't So (Google eBook)

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Simon and Schuster, Jun 30, 2008 - Psychology - 224 pages
41 Reviews
Thomas Gilovich offers a wise and readable guide to the fallacy of the obvious in everyday life.

When can we trust what we believe—that "teams and players have winning streaks," that "flattery works," or that "the more people who agree, the more likely they are to be right"—and when are such beliefs suspect? Thomas Gilovich offers a guide to the fallacy of the obvious in everyday life. Illustrating his points with examples, and supporting them with the latest research findings, he documents the cognitive, social, and motivational processes that distort our thoughts, beliefs, judgments and decisions. In a rapidly changing world, the biases and stereotypes that help us process an overload of complex information inevitably distort what we would like to believe is reality. Awareness of our propensity to make these systematic errors, Gilovich argues, is the first step to more effective analysis and action.
  

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Review: How We Know What Isn't So: The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life

User Review  - Todd Martin - Goodreads

“People will always prefer black-and-white over shades of grey, and so there will always be the temptation to hold overly-simplified beliefs and to hold them with excessive confidence.” - Thomas ... Read full review

Review: How We Know What Isn't So: The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life

User Review  - Nancy - Goodreads

Seriously, a must read! Read full review

Contents

PART
7
PART
73
The Biasing
88
PART THREE
123
Belief in the Effectiveness of Questionable
146
Belief in ESP
156
PART FOUR
183
Notes
195
Index
214
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Thomas Gilovich is a professor of psychology at Cornell University and author of How We Know What Isn't So. He lives in Ithaca, New York.

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