Hesperides: or, The works both humane and divine of Robert Herrick, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
W. Pickering, 1846
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 167 - We have short time to stay, as you, We have as short a Spring; As quick a growth to meet decay As you, or any thing. We die, As your hours do, and dry Away Like to the Summer's rain; Or as the pearls of morning's dew, Ne'er to be found again.
Page 144 - Bid me to live, and I will live Thy Protestant to be; Or bid me love, and I will give A loving heart to thee. A heart as soft, a heart as kind, A heart as sound and free, As in the whole world thou canst find, That heart I'll give to thee. Bid that heart stay, and it will stay, To honour thy decree; Or bid it languish quite away, And 't shall do so for thee.
Page 89 - There's not a budding boy or girl this day But is got up, and gone to bring in May.
Page 237 - Twas pity Nature brought ye forth Merely to show your worth, And lose you quite. But you are lovely leaves, where we May read how soon things have Their end, though ne'er so brave: And after they have shown their pride Like you, awhile, they glide Into the grave.
Page 126 - ... weep My pains asleep ; And give me such reposes That I, poor I, May think thereby I live and die 'Mongst roses. Fall on me like a silent dew, Or like those maiden showers Which, by the peep of day, do strew A baptism o'er the flowers. Melt, melt my pains With thy soft strains ; That, having ease me given, With full delight I leave this light, And take my flight For heaven.
Page 88 - Besides, the childhood of the day has kept, Against you come, some orient pearls unwept. Come, and receive them while the light Hangs on the dew-locks of the night: And Titan on the eastern hill Retires himself, or else stands still Till you come forth! Wash, dress, be brief in praying: Few beads are best when once we go a-Maying.
Page 108 - TO VIOLETS WELCOME, maids of honour, You do bring In the Spring ; And wait upon her. She has virgins many, Fresh and fair ; Yet you are More sweet than any.
Page 240 - Then may your plants be pressed with fruit, Nor bee or hive you have be mute, But sweetly sounding like a lute. Next may your duck and teeming hen Both to the cock's-tread say Amen, And for their two eggs render ten. Last, may your harrows, shares and ploughs, Your stacks, your stocks, your sweetest mows, All prosper by your virgin-vows.
Page xx - t shall do so for thee. Bid me to weep, and I will weep, While I have eyes to see: And having none, yet I will keep A heart to weep for thee. Bid me despair, and I'll despair Under that cypress tree: Or bid me die, and I will dare E'en death to die for thee. Thou art my life, my love, my heart, The very eyes of me: And hast command of every part, To live and die for thee.
Page 78 - SWEET, be not proud of those two eyes Which, starlike, sparkle in their skies ; Nor be you proud that you can see All hearts your captives, yours yet free ; Be you not proud of that rich hair Which wantons with the love-sick air ; Whenas that ruby which you wear, Sunk from the tip of your soft ear, Will last to be a precious stone When all your world of beauty's gone.

Bibliographic information