The Microscope and Its Revelations (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1875
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Contents

Section of Petiole of Fern
201
Sori of Polipodium after Payer
202
Ditto of Hatmionitis ditto 204 Sorus and Indusium of A tpidium
204
Ditto of Deparia after Payer
205
Development of Prothallium of Pteris after Suminski
206
Antheridia and antherozoids of Pteris after Suminski
207
Archegonium of Pteris after Suminski
208
Spores of Equitctum after Payer
209
Section of leaf of Agave after Hartig
210
Section of Aralia rice paper
211
Stellate Parenchyma of Rush
212
Cubical Parenchyma of Nuhar
213
Adjustment of ObjectGlass 179 Determination of Magnifying
214
Circulation in hairs of Tradcscantia after Slack Testa of StarAnise
215
Section of Coquillanut
218
Spiral cells of Oncidium
219
Microscopic Dissection 217 Preparation of Specimens
220
Cells of Paony filled with Starch
221
Starchgrains under polarised light
222
Glandular fibres of Coniferous Wood
223
Vascular tissue of Italian Ilccd after Schleiden
224
Transverse section of Stem of Palm Ditto ditto Wanghic Cane
225
Transverse section of Stem of Clematis
228
Ditto ditto Rhavuius
229
Portion of the same more highly magnified
230
Transverse section of Htizel
231
Portion of Transverse section of Stem of Cedar
232
Cutting Sections of Harder Sub Glass Slides
233
Vertical section of Fossil Conifer radial Ditto Ditto tangential
234
Transverse section of Aristolochia
237
Ditto of Burdock
238
Cuticle of Yucca Ditto of Indian Corn Ditto of Appe after Brongniart Ditto of Rochca Ditto Vertical Section of Leaf of Rochca after Brongniart
239
Chemical Actions 227 Mounting Objects in Canada
242
Cuticle of Iris Ditto
244
Vertical Section of Leaf of Iris Ditto
245
Longitudinal Section of ditto Cuticle of Petal of Geranium Ditto
246
Various forms of Amcebina after Ehrenberg
253
Grtgarina from Earthworm after Lieberkuhn
254
Spfutrozoum ovjdimare after Haeckel
255
Kerona silnras and Paramecium caudatum after MilneEdwards 257 Groop of Vorlicellce after Ehrenberg
257
Fissiparous Multiplication of Chilodon after Ehrenberg
258
Encysting process in Vorticella after Stein
259
Metamorphosis of Trickoda after Haime
260
Brachionns pala after MilneEdwards
261
Rotifer vulgaris after Ehrenberg
262
Manducatory apparatus of Euchlanis dejlexa after Goese
263
Stephanoceros Eiehumii after Cubitt
264
Noteux guadricornis after Ehrenberg
265
Hot alia ornata after Schulze
266
Alreolina Quoii 268 Disk of Simple type of Orbitolites
268
Animal of Ditto
269
Portion of animal of Complex type of Orbitolites
270
JUiabdammina Nodosarine and Monilifurm Lituola
271
Saccamiita sJierica and Pilulina Jeffrcysii
272
Globigerine Orbuline and Nodosarine Lituola Protconitia
273
Nantiloid Lituola with internal structure
274
General view of Parkeria
275
Portion of Parkeria more highly magnified
276
Internal casts of Teztularia and Rotalia after Ehrenberg
277
Tinopurus baculatus
278
Section of Paujasina after Williamson
279
Vertical Section of calcareous Shell of Eoziion Canadense
290
Varietal modifications of Astromma
291
Baliomma Humboldtii after Ehrenberg
292
PericMamydium prozlexlum Ditto
293
Stylodyetya gracilis Ditto
294
Astromma Arulotelis Ditto
295
Polycystina from Barbadoes Ditto
296
Structure of Grantia after Dobie
297
Portion of Halichmdria 299 Siliceous spicules of Pachymatina
299
Hydra fusca after MilneEdwards 301 Ditto in gemmation after Trembley
301
Medusabuds of Syncoryna after Sars
302
Sertularia cupressina after Johnston 304 Thaumantias pilosella after E Forbes
304
Development of Medusabuds after Dalyell 3iirface
305
Development of Medusa after Dalyell
306
Filiferous capsules of Actinia c after Gosse 308 Spicules of Alcyonium and Gorgonia
308
Spicules of Gorgonia guttata and Muricea elongate
309
Oydippe and Beroe after MilneEdwards
310
Noctiluca miliaris after Quatrefages 312 Section of Shell of Echin
312
Calcareous reticulation of Spine of Echinus
313
Ambulacra Disk of Echinus 315 Transverse Section of Spine of Acrocladia
315
Spines of Spatangus
316
Structure of Tooth of EcJdnus after Salter 602
318
Calcareous skeleton of Holothuria
319
Ditto of Synapta
320
Ditto of Ckirodota
321
Bipinnarian larva of StarJish after Miiller
322
Pluteuslarva of Echinus after Miiller
323
Anledon rosaceus Comatula rosacea
324
Pentacrinoid larva of Antalon after Thomson
325
Ceils of Lepraluc after Johnston
326
Birdshead processes of Cellularia and Buguh and Busk
327
Arnaroucium proliferum after MilneEdwards
328
Botryllut violaccns Ditto
329
Perojihora after Lister 628
331
Membranous basis of ditto
332
33i Vertical Section of ditto 834 Oblique Section of Shell of Pinna 335 Nacre of Avicula
335
Section of hingetooth of
336
Vertical Section of Shell of Unio
337
Internal and external surfaces of Shell of Tmbntula
338
Vertical Sections of ditto ditto
339
Horizontal Section of Shell of Terebralula bullata
340
Ditto ditto of Megerliu lima
341
Ditto ditto of Spirifcrina rostrata
342
Palate of Helix horiensis
343
Ditto of Zonites cellarius
344
Ditto of Trochus zizyphinut
345
Ditto of Doris tuberculata
346
Ditto of Buccinnm under Polarized light
347
Parasitic Larvae Glochidium of Anodon after Houghti
348
Embryonic development of Doris after Reid
349
Embryonic development of Purpura
350
Later stages of the same
351
Structure of Polycelis after Quatrefages
352
Circulation of Terebclla after Milne Edwards 354 Actinotrocha branchiata after Wagener
354
Development of Nemertcs from Pilidium after Krohn
355
Ammothca pyenojonoides after Quatrefages
356
Cyclops quadricomis after Baird after Johnston
357
Fields Dissecting
396
Seeds of Poppy
460
Componnd Microscopes
528

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 543 - Suppose a human mason to be put down by the side of a pile of stones of various shapes and sizes, and to be told to build a dome of these, smooth on both surfaces, without using more than the least possible quantity of a very tenacious, but very costly, cement, in holding the stones together. If he accomplished this 42 well, he would receive credit for great intelligence and skill. Yet this is exactly what these little 'jelly specks' do on a most minute scale; the 'tests' they construct, when highly...
Page 640 - Y. ON THE MODE OF FORMATION OF SHELLS OF ANIMALS, OF BONE, AND OF SEVERAL OTHER STRUCTURES, by a Process of Molecular Coalescence, Demonstrable in certain Artificially-formed Products.
Page 470 - Supposing it to rest upon its convex surface, it consists of a lower plate, shaped like a deep saucer or watch-glass; of an upper plate, which is sometimes flat, sometimes more or less watch-glass-shaped; of the oval, thick-walled, flattened corpuscle, which connects the centres of these two plates ; and of an intermediate substance, which is closely connected with the under surface of the upper plate, or more or less...
Page 324 - ... preserved by Saxo. But to the origin of the rest the genealogies give us no clue. If they were all of royal origin and apparently they did claim divine descent the Angli must have possessed a numerous royal class ; and we are scarcely justified in denying that this may have been the case1. On the other hand it is by no means impossible that some of them were sprung from foreign peoples, such as the Danes, Swedes or Warni. But what we may regard as practically certain is that the individual...
Page 326 - Point, the bottoms of which are literally covered in the first warm days of spring with a ferruginous-coloured mucous matter, about a quarter of an inch thick, which, on examination by the microscope, proves to be filled with millions and millions of these exquisitely beautiful siliceous bodies. Every submerged stone, twig, and spear of grass, is enveloped by them ; and the waving plume-like appearance of a filamentous body covered in this manner, is often extremely elegant.
Page 797 - The slices thus treated appear of a darkish amber colour, very transparent, and exhibit the structure, when existing, most clearly. We have obtained longitudinal and transverse sections of coniferous wood from various coals in this way. The specimens are best preserved in glycerine in cells ; we find that spirit renders them opaque, and even Canada balsam has the same defect. Schulz states that he has brought out the cellulose reaction with iodine, in coal treated with nitric acid and chlorate of...
Page 575 - ... each thread is about eighteen inches long, in the middle the thickness of a knitting needle, and gradually tapering towards either end to a fine point ; the whole bundle coiled like a strand of rope into a lengthened spiral, the threads of the middle and lower portions remaining compactly coiled by a permanent twist of the individual threads ; the upper portions of the coil frayed out, so that the glassy threads stand separate from each other. The spicules on the outside of the coil stretch its...
Page 797 - The coal is macerated for about a week in a solution of carbonate of potash ; at the end of that time it is possible to cut tolerably thin slices with a razor. These slices are then placed in a watchglass with strong nitric acid, covered and gently heated ; they soon turn brownish, then yellow, when the process must be arrested by dropping the whole into a saucer of cold water, else the coal would be dissolved.
Page 800 - ... fragments become smaller, and calcareous mud, structureless and in a fine state of division, is in greatly preponderating proportion. One can have no doubt, on examining this sediment, that it is formed in the main by the accumulation and disintegration of the shells of globigerina the shells fresh, whole, and living in the surface-layer of the deposit, and in the lower layers dead, and gradually crumbling down by the decomposition of their organic cement, and by the pressure of the layers...
Page 372 - Characece consists of two sets of bodies, both of which grow at the bases of the branches (Fig. 172, A, B) ; one set is known by the designation of ' globules,' the other by that of

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