Guy's Pocket Cyclopaedia: Or Miscellany of Useful Knowledge, from the Best Authorities: Designed for Senior Scholars in Schools, & for Young Persons in General... (Google eBook)

Front Cover
C. Cradock & W. Joy, 1810 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 524 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 331 - This will of his Maker is called the law of nature. For as God, when he created matter, and endued it with a principle of mobility, established certain rules for the perpetual direction of that motion ; so, when he created man, and endued him with...
Page 327 - And this is what we mean by the original contract of society; which though perhaps in no instance it has ever been formally expressed at the first institution of a state; yet in nature and reason must always be understood and implied, in the very act of associating together...
Page 477 - Let him study the Holy Scriptures, especially the New Testament. Therein are contained the words of eternal life. It has God for its Author ; salvation for its end ; and truth, without any mixture of error, for its matter.
Page 330 - ... could we be so certain of finding the three great qualities of government so well and so happily united. If the supreme power were lodged in any one of the three branches separately, we must be exposed to the inconveniences of either absolute monarchy, aristocracy, or democracy, and so want two of the three principal ingredients of good polity, either virtue, wisdom, or power.
Page 332 - When I call these parts of our law leges non scriptce, 1 would not be understood as if all those laws were at present merely oral, or communicated from the former ages to the present solely by word of mouth. It is true indeed that, in the profound ignorance of letters which formerly overspread the whole western world...
Page 332 - The lex non scripta, or unwritten law, includes not only general customs, or the common law, properly so called ; but also the particular customs of certain parts of the kingdom ; and likewise those particular laws that are, by custom, observed only in certain courts and jurisdictions.
Page 491 - Sabbatarians, however, think these reasons unsatisfactory, and assert that the change of the Sabbath from the seventh to the first day of the week, was effected by Constantine, upon his conversion to the Christian religion.
Page 474 - It is true that a little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion.
Page 406 - The creation is a perpetual feast to the mind of a good man ; every thing he sees, cheers and delights him. Providence has imprinted so many smiles on nature, that it is impossible for a mind which is not sunk in more gross and sensual delights, to take a survey of them without several secret sensations of pleasure.
Page 329 - For, as with us the executive power of the laws is lodged in a single person, they have all the advantages of strength and dispatch that are to be found in the most absolute monarchy: and as the legislature of the kingdom is entrusted to three distinct powers, entirely independent of each other: first, the king; secondly, the lords, spiritual and temporal, which is an aristocratical assembly of persons selected for their piety, their birth, their wisdom...

Bibliographic information