Grose's Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue: Revised and Corrected with the Addition of Numerous Slang Phrases Collected from Tried Authorities (Google eBook)

Front Cover
editor and sold, 1823 - English language - 242 pages
1 Review
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxiv - I conceive that words are like money, not the worse for being common, but that it is the stamp of custom alone that gives them circulation or value.
Page xxiv - To cut with a knife, or To cut a piece of wood, is perfectly free from vulgarity, because it is perfectly common: but to cut an acquaintance is not quite unexceptionable, because it is not perfectly common or intelligible, and has hardly yet escaped out of the limits of slang phraseology. I should hardly therefore use the word in this sense without putting it in italics as a license of expression, to be received cum grano salis.
Page xxv - ... it is not the size or glossiness of the materials, but their being fitted each to its place, that gives strength to the arch ; or as the pegs and nails are as necessary to the support of the building as the larger timbers, and more so than the mere showy, unsubstantial ornaments.
Page xxx - In the one he received, and from the other paid ; and this too with a want of circumspection which may be readily supposed from- such a mode of book-keeping. His losses on this occasion roused his latent talents: with a good classical education he united a fine taste for drawing, which he now began again to cultivate; and encouraged by his -friends, he undertook the work from which he derived both profit and reputation : his Views of Antiquities in England and Wales, which he first began to publish...

Bibliographic information