Selected Political Speeches

Front Cover
Penguin Books Limited, 1969 - Foreign Language Study - 335 pages
9 Reviews
Amid the corruption and power struggles of the collapse of the Roman Republic, Cicero (106-43BC) produced some of the most stirring and eloquent speeches in history. A statesman and lawyer, he was one of the only outsiders to penetrate the aristocratic circles that controlled the Roman state, and became renowned for his speaking to the Assembly, Senate and courtrooms. Whether fighting corruption, quashing the Catiline conspiracy, defending the poet Archias or railing against Mark Antony in the Philippics - the magnificent arguments in defence of liberty which led to his banishment and death - Cicero’s speeches are oratory masterpieces, vividly evocative of the cut and thrust of Roman political life.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - drmaf - LibraryThing

Cicero was, admittedly, a pompus git. He was almost certainly not well-liked by most of his fellow senators, and was held in contempt by not a few. He was, however, arguably the finest orator in Roman ... Read full review

Review: Selected Political Speeches

User Review  - David Antoš - Goodreads

I liked the book. It was quite fun to get an insight into life and thinking of one of the greatest politicians of late Roman Republic. In spite of and perhaps thanks to all the pettiness and short-term pragmatism that no human can really avoid. :-) Read full review

About the author (1969)

Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BC), Roman orator and statesman, was born at Arpinum of a wealthy local family. He was taken to Rome for his education with the idea of a public career and by the year 70 he had established himself as the leading barrister in Rome. In the meantime his political career was well under way and he was elected praetor for the year 66. One of the most permanent features of his political life was his attachment to Pompeii. As a politician, his greatest failing was his consistent refusal to compromise; as a statesman his ideals were more honorable and unselfish than those of his contemporaries. Cicero was the greatest of the roman orators, posessing a wide range of technique and an excpetional command of the Latin tongue. He followed the common practice of publishing his speeches, but he also produced a large number of works on the theory and practice of rhetoric, on religion, and on moral and political philosophy. He played a leading part in the development of the Latin hexameter. Perhaps the most interesting of all his works is the collection fo 900 remarkably informative letters, published posthumously. These not only contain a first-hand account of social and political life in the upper classes at Rome, but also reflect the changing personal feelings of an emotional and sensitive man.

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