Classical Mechanics: Point Particles and Relativity

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Jan 19, 2004 - Mathematics - 488 pages
1 Review
More than a generation of German-speaking students around the world have worked their way to an understanding and appreciation of the power and beauty of modern theoretical physics—with mathematics, the most fundamental of sciences—using Walter Greiner’s textbooks as their guide. The idea of developing a coherent, complete presentation of an entire ?eld of science in a series of closely related textbooks is not a new one. Many older physicians remember with real pleasure their sense of adventure and discovery as they worked their ways through the classic series by Sommerfeld, by Planck, and by Landau and Lifshitz. From the students’ viewpoint, there are a great many obvious advantages to be gained through the use of consistent notation, logical ordering of topics, and coherence of presentation; beyond this, thecompletecoverageofthescienceprovidesauniqueopportunityfortheauthortoconvey his personal enthusiasm and love for his subject. These volumes on classical physics, ?nally available in English, complement Greiner’s textsonquantumphysics,mostofwhichhavebeenavailabletoEnglish-speakingaudiences for some time. The complete set of books will thus provide a coherent view of physics that includes, in classical physics, thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, classical dyn- ics, electromagnetism, and general relativity; and in quantum physics, quantum mechanics, symmetries, relativistic quantum mechanics, quantum electro- and chromodynamics, and the gauge theory of weak interactions.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction and Basic Definitions
2
The Scalar Product
5
Component Representation of a Vector
9
The Vector Product Axial Vector
13
The Triple Scalar Product
25
Application of Vector Calculus
27
Differentiation and Integration of Vectors
39
The Moving Trihedral Accompanying Dreibein the Frenet Formulas
49
Determination of astronomic quantities
296
Properties position and evolution of the solar system
308
World views
315
On the evolution of the universe
325
Dark Matter
330
What is the nature of the dark matter?
338
THEORY OF RELATIVITY
361
Relativity Principle and MichelsonMorley Experiment
362

Surfaces in Space
64
Coordinate Frames
68
Vector Differential Operations
83
Differential operators in arbitrary general curvilinear coordinates
96
Determination of Line Integrals
109
The Integral Laws of Gauss and Stokes
112
Calculation of Surface Integrals
125
Volume Space Integrals
130
NEWTONIAN MECHANICS
133
Newtons Axioms
134
Basic Concepts of Mechanics
140
Measurement of masses
141
Kinetic energy
142
Potential
143
Energy law
144
Angular momentum and torque
149
Conservation law of angular momentum
150
The law of areas
151
The General Linear Motion
159
The Free Fall
163
Vertical throw
164
Inclined throw
166
Friction
172
Motion in a viscous medium with Newtonian friction
177
The Harmonic Oscillator
196
Mathematical Interlude Series Expansion Eulers Formulas
210
The Damped Harmonic Oscillator
214
The Pendulum
229
Mathematical Interlude Differential Equations
241
Planetary Motions
246
Special Problems in Central Fields
282
The attractive force of a spherical mass shell
283
The gravitational potential of a spherical shell covered with mass
285
Stability of circular orbits
289
The Earth and our Solar System
295
The MichelsonMorley experiment
364
The Lorentz Transformation
370
Rotation of a threedimensional coordinate frame
372
The Minkowski space
374
Group property of the Lorentz transformation
383
Properties of the Lorentz transformation
389
LorentzFitzgerald length contraction
394
Note on the invisibility of the LorentzFitzgerald length contraction
396
The visible appearance of quickly moving bodies
398
Optical appearance of bodies moving with almost the speed of light
400
Light intensity distribution of a moving isotropic emitter
404
Doppler shift of quickly moving bodies
407
Relativistic spacetime structure spacetime events
412
Relativistic past present future
413
The causality principle
414
The Lorentz transformation in the twodimensional subspace of the Minkowski space
415
Addition Theorem of the Velocities
419
Supervelocity of light phase and group velocity
421
The Basic Quantities of Mechanics in Minkowski Space
425
Lorentz scalars
426
Fourvelocity in Minkowski space
427
Momentum in Minkowski space
428
Kinetic energy
433
The Tachyon hypothesis
442
Derivation of the energy law in the Minkowski space
444
The fourth momentum component
445
Conservation of momentum and energy for a free particle
446
Examples on the equivalence of mass and energy
448
Applications of the Special Theory of Relativity
461
Compton scattering
465
The inelastic collision
468
Decay of an unstable particle
470
Index
485
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Greiner-Institut fur Theoretische Physik, Frankfurt, Germany

Bibliographic information