The chameleon's shadow

Front Cover
Macmillan, Oct 15, 2007 - Fiction - 384 pages
22 Reviews

When Lieutenant Charles Acland is flown home from Iraq with serious head injuries, he faces not only permanent disfigurement but also an apparent change to his previously outgoing personality.

Crippled by migraines, and suspicious of his psychiatrist, he begins to display sporadic bouts of aggression, particularly against women, especially his ex-fiancee who seems unable to accept that the relationship is over.

After his injuries prevent his return to the army, he cuts all ties with his former life and moves to London. Alone and unmonitored, he sinks into a private world of guilt and paranoid distrust . . . until a customer annoys him in a Bermondsey pub . . .

Out of control and only prevented from killing the man by the intervention of a 250-pound female weightlifter called Jackson, he attracts the attention of police who are investigating three 'gay' murders in the Bermondsey area which appear to have been motivated by extreme rage . . .

Under suspicion, Acland is forced to confront the real issues behind his isolation. How much control does he have over the dark side of his personality? Do his migraines contribute to his rages? Has he always been the duplicitous chameleon that his ex-fiancee claims?

And why - if he hates women - does he look to a woman for help?

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Ameise1 - LibraryThing

It was a great reading. I liked the injured Lieutenant Charles Acland. He had his secrets but was also one of the reliable characters. The police made a fool of themselves. Mostly nothing has been ... Read full review

Review: The Chameleon's Shadow

User Review  - Sharon Terry - Goodreads

Absorbing, well-executed, intriguing thriller, with some oddball characters and situations, but got bogged down in a bit too much detail toward the end. Ex-army man Lt Charles Acland returns home to ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
9
Section 3
21
Copyright

29 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

British mystery writer Minette Walters began her literary career as a sub-editor at a romance publishing company. She wrote short stories and romance novels for a time before turning to writing mysteries. Her first mystery novel, The Ice House (1992), won the John Creasy Award for Best First Novel. Later novels have also been award winners. Scold's Bridle won a CWA Gold Dagger and The Sculptress (which was made into a BBC television play) won an Edgar Award.

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