History of the Town of Lexington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts: History (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin, 1913 - Lexington (Mass.)
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Contents

I
1
II
45
III
66
IV
88
V
107
VI
123
VII
177
VIII
206
XV
333
XVI
351
XVII
378
XVIII
396
XIX
412
XX
444
XXI
457
XXII
466

IX
225
X
248
XI
262
XII
280
XIII
304
XIV
318
XXIII
475
XXIV
483
XXV
497
XXVI
516
Copyright

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Page 70 - ... shall have and enjoy all liberties and immunities of free and natural subjects within any of the dominions of us, our heirs and successors, to all intents, constructions, and purposes whatsoever as if they and every of them were born within this our realm of England.
Page 378 - It being one chief project of that old deluder, Satan, to keep men from the knowledge of the Scriptures, as in former times by keeping them in an unknown tongue, so in these latter times by persuading from the use of tongues, that so at least the true sense and meaning of the original might be clouded by false glosses of saintseeming deceivers, that learning may not be buried in the grave of our fathers in the church and commonwealth, the Lord assisting our endeavors...
Page 211 - It is the united voice of America to preserve their freedom, or lose their lives in defence of it. Their resolutions are not the effects of inconsiderate rashness, but the sound result of sober inquiry and deliberation. I am convinced that the true spirit of liberty was never so universally diffused throughout all ranks and orders of people, in any country on the face of the earth, as it now is through all North America.
Page 135 - I do hereby in his majesty's name, offer and promise his most gracious pardon, to all persons who shall forthwith lay down their arms, and return to the duties of peaceable subjects, excepting only from the benefit of such pardon, SAMUEL ADAMS and JOHN HANCOCK, whose offences are of too flagitious a nature to admit of any other consideration than that of condign punishment.
Page 379 - It is therefore ordered, that every township in this jurisdiction, after the Lord hath increased them to the number of fifty householders, shall then forthwith appoint one within their town to teach all such children as shall resort to him to write and read...
Page 117 - Thucydides, and have studied and admired the master states of the world, that, for solidity of reasoning, force of sagacity, and wisdom of conclusion, under such a complication of circumstances, no nation or body of men can stand in preference to the general Congress at Philadelphia.
Page 176 - I related the story of the two officers, and supposed that he must have been stopped, as he ought to have been there before me. After I had been there about half an hour, Mr. Dawes came. We refreshed ourselves, and set off for Concord, to secure the stores, etc., there.
Page 176 - Mr. Dawes and the Doctor stopped to alarm the people of a house : I was about one hundred rods ahead, when I saw two men in nearly the same situation as those officers were, near Charlestown. I called for the Doctor and Mr. Dawes to come up ; in an instant I was surrounded by four ; they had placed themselves in a straight road, that inclined each way ; they had taken down a pair of bars on the north side of the road, and two of them were under a tree in the pasture. The Doctor being foremost,...
Page 378 - ... to the end that learning may not be buried in the graves of our forefathers in church and commonwealth, the Lord assisting our endeavors.
Page 119 - ... your lives, to hand inviolate to posterity. Continue steadfast, and, with a proper sense of your dependence on God, nobly defend those rights which heaven gave, and no man ought to take from us.

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