Mathematical Analysis

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Addison-Wesley, Jan 1, 1974 - Mathematics - 492 pages
5 Reviews
It provides a transition from elementary calculus to advanced courses in real and complex function theory and introduces the reader to some of the abstract thinking that pervades modern analysis.

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A classic introduction that is just that.

Review: Mathematical Analysis

User Review  - Ross Lund - Goodreads

Probably the only mathematical text I have ever read cover-to-cover. A very good introduction to Analysis as long as you already have some maths background. Naturally as a pure maths text it is very dry, with some positively arid sections, even for one interested in learning the subject. Read full review

Contents

The Real and Complex Number Systems
1
Some Basic Notions of Set Theory
32
Elements of Point Set Topology
47
Copyright

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About the author (1974)

Tom M. Apostol joined the California Institute of Technology faculty in 1950 and is now Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus. He is internationally known for his textbooks on Calculus, Analysis, and Analytic Number Theory, which have been translated into 5 languages, and for creating Project MATHEMATICS!, a series of video programs that bring mathematics to life with computer animation, live action, music, and special effects. The videos have won first-place honors at a dozen international video festivals, and have been translated into Hebrew, Portuguese, French and Spanish. His list of publications includes 98 research papers, 46 of them published since he retired in 1992. He has received several awards for his research and teaching. In 1978 he was a visiting professor at the University of Patras in Greece, and in 2000 was elected a Corresponding Member of the Academy of Athens, where he delivered his inaugural lecture in Greek.

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