You Are What You Choose: The Habits of Mind That Really Determine How We Make Decisions (Google eBook)

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Penguin, Nov 12, 2009 - Business & Economics - 208 pages
7 Reviews
The hidden patterns behind the way we make decisions

Several recent books, from Blink to Freakonomics to Predictably Irrational, have examined how people make choices. But none explain why different people have such different styles of decision making—and why those styles seem consistent across many contexts. For instance, why is a gambler always a gambler, whether at work, on the highway, or in a voting booth?

Scott de Marchi and James T. Hamilton present a new theory about how we decide, based on an extensive survey of more than thirty thousand subjects. They show that each of us possesses six core traits that shape every decision, from what to have for lunch to where to invest. We go with “the usual” way of deciding whenever there’s a trade-off between current and future happiness, when facing the risk of a bad outcome, or when a choice might hurt other people. We’re also consistent about how much information we want and how much we care about the opinions of others.

Readers can determine their own decision-making profile with a test in the book. Once they understand the six core traits, they’ll have a big advantage in their marketing campaigns, management strategies, investments, and many other contexts.


  

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Review: You Are What You Choose: The Habits of Mind That Really Determine How We Make Decisions

User Review  - Mischa Dewalt - Goodreads

Interesting model to predict how we choose things, but I wish they would have delved more into TRAITS rather than referencing it. I would have also enjoyed a more lengthy quiz on determine ones own TRAITS. I did enjoy the real life applications of the model, historical and relatable. Read full review

Review: You Are What You Choose: The Habits of Mind That Really Determine How We Make Decisions

User Review  - syikin_star - Goodreads

Interesting topic but written in education/technical format. Read full review

Contents

SEX SELLS
PEAS IN A POD
POLITICS
ULTIMATE FIGHTING
ILL HAVE THE USUAL
GOT CHICKEN?
CORE TRAITS
THE HORSE RACE
THE GREEN LIFE
FANS ARE EVERYWHERE
POLITICS AS SPORT
WHOS KNOCKING ON YOUR DOOR?
WILDEYED BELIEVERS
DO AS I VOTE NOT AS I DO PART 1
DO AS I VOTE NOT AS I DO PART 2
LOOKING FOR FANS

TRAITS IN ACTION
NOBODY SNEEZE
TEXAS HOLDEM INTERNET STYLE
WE HAVE ALL BEEN HERE BEFORE
FISHY ADVICE FROM WALL STREET
EVERYBODY LIES GREGORY HOUSE MD
TESTING THE TRAITS MODEL
INVESTMENT
DRUG CZAR CLIMATE CZAR GAY MARRIAGE CZAR?
TO DRINK OR NOT TO DRINK? THAT IS THE QUESTION
KEEPING SCORE
BUYING A SAFE CAR
PIMP MY RIDE?
APPEAL TO THE RIGHT TRAITS
EATING OUT WITH GUILT
BUSH APPROVAL RATINGS
HAPPINESS IS A WARM GUN
SEEK AND YOU SHALL FIND
ITS NOT EASY BEING GREEN
RECYCLING
ALL FUN AND GAMES UNTIL SOMEONE LOSES A BILLION
THE ONRAMP ONLINE
LIFE ON THE POLITICAL EDGE
DO YOU FEEL LUCKY?
TEXAS HOLDEM FOR FUN AND PROFIT
HOW TO GET AHEAD IN ADVERTISING
IM A MAC YOURE A PC AND THIS MEANS IM WAY COOLER THAN YOU
WHATS LOVE GOT TO DO WITH IT?
WHAT IS TO BE DONE?
INTRODUCTION
2 YOU ARE WHAT YOU CHOOSE
3 HAPPY HEALTHY AND WISE
4 ALLCONSUMING
5 CONSUMING POLITICS
6 EARLY ADOPTERS
7 TRAITS IN THE WILD
CONCLUSION
WHAT ARE YOUR TRAITS?
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Scott de Marchi is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Duke University. His work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, and he has published articles in the American Political Science Review, Journal of Politics, Journal of Theoretical Politics and Public Choice. Professor de Marchi was appointed a Fellow-at-Large by the Santa Fe Institute in 1999, and is a faculty member of the Ralph Bunche Summer Institute and the Empirical Implications of Theoretical Models program. His research continues to focus on the field of computational political economy and other mathematical methods, individual decision-making, the presidency, and public policy.

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