Black's guide to Italy (Google eBook)

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1869
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Page 159 - John Keats died at Rome of a consumption, in his twenty-fourth year, on the of 1821 ; and was buried in the romantic and lonely cemetery of the Protestants in that city, under the pyramid which is the tomb of Cestius, and the massy walls and towers, now mouldering and desolate, which formed the circuit of ancient Rome. The cemetery is an open space among the ruins, covered in winter with violets and daisies. It might make one in love with death, to think that one should be buried in so sweet a place.
Page 194 - There is a fixed and pale composure upon the features ; she seems sad and stricken down in spirit, yet the despair thus expressed is lightened by the patience of gentleness. Her head is bound with folds of white drapery from which the yellow strings of her golden hair escape and fall about her neck. The moulding of her face is exquisitely delicate ; the eyebrows are distinct and arched ; the lips have that permanent meaning of imagination aud sensibility which suffering has not repressed and which...
Page 194 - Her head is bound with folds of white drapery from which the yellow strings of her golden hair escape, and fall about her neck. The moulding of her face is exquisitely delicate ; the eyebrows are distinct and arched : the lips have that permanent meaning of imagination and sensibility which suffering has not repressed and which it seems as if death scarcely could extinguish. Her forehead is large and clear ; her eyes which we are told were remarkable for their vivacity, are swollen with weeping and...
Page 209 - And wherefore slaughtered ? wherefore, but because Such were the bloody circus' genial laws, And the imperial pleasure. Wherefore not ? What matters where we fall to fill the maws Of worms on battle-plains or listed spot ? Both are but theatres where the chief actors rot.
Page 227 - For our remembrance, and from out the plain Heaves like a long-swept wave about to break, And on the curl hangs pausing: not in vain May he, who will, his recollections rake And quote in classic raptures, and awake The hills with...
Page 72 - ... several Doges. From the Rialto, on the south bank of the canal, is (No. 9 in plan) the Palazzo Corner della Regina, now one of the Government pawn establishments. No. 8, the Palazzo Pesaro, open from 9 to 4 ; fee, 1 fr., and 25 c. to the door-keeper. No. 7, the Palazzo Correr, containing a museum, open to the public on Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday, from 10 to 4. It contains an interesting collection of old arms and armour, ceramic ware, glass, bronzes, carved ivory and wood, gems, etc. As...
Page 264 - And from thence we fetched a compass, and came to Rhegium: and after one day the south wind blew, and we came the next day to Puteoli: 14 Where we found 'brethren, and were desired to tarry with them seven days: and so we went toward Rome.
Page 256 - ... movemur enim nescio quo pacto locis ipsis, in quibus eorum quos diligimus aut admiramur adsunt vestigia...
Page 194 - Guido during her confinement in prison. But it is most interesting as a just representation of one of the loveliest specimens of the workmanship of Nature. There is a fixed and pale composure upon the features : she seems sad and stricken down in spirit, yet the despair thus expressed is lightened by the patience of gentleness.
Page 215 - This Poem was chiefly written upon the mountainous ruins of the Baths of Caracalla, among the flowery glades and thickets of odoriferous blossoming trees, which are extended in ever winding labyrinths upon its immense platforms and dizzy arches suspended in the air.

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