Readings in Indiana history (Google eBook)

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Published by Indiana University, 1914 - History - 470 pages
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Contents

Pottawattomie Story of How the Indian Race Began
29
Shawnee Tradition of Indian Origins
30
Training of Indian Youth
31
On the Warpath
32
Indian Ceremony of Adoption
34
Post Vincennes
36
Ouiatanon
38
At the Miami Village
40
French Life on the Wabash
41
CHAPTER III
47
Clark Prepares for the Expedition 1777
49
Desertion at the Ohio Falls
50
Capture of Kaskaskia
52
Father Gibaults Mission to Vincennes
54
Capture of Ouiatanon
55
Vincennes Retaken by the British
56
Clark Moves on Vincennes
59
CHAPTER IV
64
Gamelins Mission to the Miamis
68
General Scott Destroys Ouiatanon
74
General Wilkinsons Reeonnoitering Party
79
The Stephen Ashby Family
83
A Thrilling Rescue
87
Letters from the Frontier 18091810
103
The Council at Vincennes 1810
105
The March
111
The Battle of Tippecanoe
119
Fort Harrison
123
Pigeon Roost Massacre
128
Siege of Fort Wayne
131
Life on the TwelveMile Purchase from 1810 to 1814
135
In the Vallonia Neighborhood
137
The Maria Creek Settlement
144
41a The Pioneers
146
PIONEER INDIANA 1816 TO 1836
147
CHAPTER VI
149
A View of the New State
153
The Creep of Civilized Life
155
CHAPTER VII
156
Whetzels Trace
157
Migration to the New Purchase
161
Through Storm and Flood
166
48a To Indiana
170
CHAPTER VIII
171
Cutting Rolling and Burning Logs
172
LogRoilingA Western Frolic
173
CHAPTER IX
175
A Pioneer Homestead
177
The Pioneer Home
182
CHAPTER X
191
Cost of Preparing a New Farm
192
Prairie versus Timber Lands
194
Stock
196
Hogs
197
CHAPTER XI
198
Squatters
199
Land Speculators
201
Land Sales at Crawfordsville
203
How the Public Lands were Surveyed
206
CHAPTER XII
210
The Buffalo Trace
214
Two Improved Highways
217
A Plank Road
220
A Corduroy Road
222
Some Early Stage Lines
223
Slow Travel by Stage
225
An Old Time Western Tavern
226
Travel on the Old National Road
252
Along the Wabash and Erie Canal
254
CHAPTER XIV
257
82a Some Hoosier Characteristics
258
Social Gatherings in Pioneer Times
262
The ShootingMatch
264
The Terms
271
The Weapons
273
The Militia Muster
274
The Cornstalk Militia
275
A Muster on the Wea Plains
276
Father Rapp at New Harmony
277
Robert Owen and New Harmony
280
CHAPTER XV
283
SnakeKilling on the Big Wea
285
BearCatching Near Prides Fort
288
Adventure with a Panther
290
Wolf Tales of the Forest
291
An OldTime Grist Mill
292
CHAPTER XVI
294
Some Pioneer Preachers
298
QuarterlyMeeting Penitence
304
An OldTime Camp Meeting
306
Life at a CampMeeting
311
Preachers on the Circuit
314
CHAPTER XVII
322
A Pioneer School
323
Loud Schools
327
School Customs of Early Days
329
CHAPTER XVIII
333
ChokeTrap Justice
334
A Sheriff Outwitted
337
Legislating in the Backwoods
339
An Election at Terre Haute in 1851
341
Sickness and Exposure in the Wilderness
344
Some Old Recipes
350
CHAPTER XXII
357
CHAPTER XXIII
363
Perils of a Congressional Campaign
371
NATIONAL QUESTIONS 1844 TO 1876
377
The Slavery Contest in Indiana PAGE 128 Slave Indentures in Indiana Territory
379
Beechers View of the Fugitive Slave Law
382
A Struggle for Liberty
385
A SlaveHunter Outwitted
390
Jerry Sullivans Raid at the Old Dongola Bridge
395
Eldridge Hopkins to the Rescue
401
CHAPTER XXVII
407
Governor Morton as the Soldiers Friend
410
Governor Morton as a Leader
413
Newspaper Story of Morgans Raid
415
General Dukes Account
417
A Raw Recruit
420
CHAPTER XXVIII
421
A Soldiers Hardships in Virginia
423
The Affair at Romney
425
Scenes Around Corinth
428
On Scout Duty
429
On the FiringLineAt Antictam
431
On the March
435
CHAPTER XXIX
439
Rights of the Negro in Indiana
441
A Colored SundaySchool
442
CHAPTER XXX
445
Indiana Poem
450
OUTLINES FOR STUDY
451
24a Clark Retakes Vincennes 61
465
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Page 211 - The voluntary outpouring of the public feeling, made to-day, from the North to the South, and from the East to the West, proves this sentiment to be both just and natural.
Page 39 - I have been fortunate enough to remove their prejudice, and, in a great measure, their suspicions against the English. The country hereabouts is exceedingly pleasant, being open and clear for many miles; the soil very rich and well watered ; all plants have a quick vegetation, and the climate very temperate through the winter. This post has always been a very considerable trading place. The great plenty of furs taken in this country, induced the French to establish this post, which was the first...
Page 409 - Constitution in order to form a more perfect union, to establish justice, and to secure the blessings of liberty to themselves and their posterity, intended to empower the Federal Government to exclude slavery from the territories.
Page 38 - French families settled on the east side of this river, being one of the finest situations that can be found. The country is level and clear, and the soil very rich, producing wheat and tobacco. I think the latter preferable to that of Maryland or Virginia.
Page 258 - Hoosier met him at the door, Their salutations soon were o'er. He took the stranger's horse aside And to a sturdy sapling tied. Then having stripped the saddle off, He fed him in a sugar trough.
Page 125 - ... and in spite of every exertion we could make use of, in less than a moment it ascended to the roof and baffled every effort we could make to extinguish it. As that...
Page 410 - In all trying positions in which I shall be placed and, doubtless, I shall be placed in many such my reliance will be placed upon you and the people of the United States ; and I wish you to remember, now and forever, that it is your business, and not mine ; that if the union of these States and the liberties of this people shall be lost, it is but little to any one man of fifty-two years of age, but a great deal to the thirty millions of people who inhabit these United States, and to their...
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Page 174 - ... only, it occurs frequently in the course of a year amongst the old settlers, with whom it is a continued bond of amity and social intercourse, and in no part of the world is good neighbourship found in greater perfection than in the western territory, or in America generally.
Page 21 - Wantoned as in her prime, and played at will Her virgin fancies, pouring forth more sweet, Wild above rule or art, enormous bliss.

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