Isles of Refuge: Wildlife and History of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Google eBook)

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University of Hawaii Press, Jan 1, 2001 - Science - 205 pages
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"Over the course of two decades, field biologist Mark Rauzon visited nine of the ten islands. In Isles of Refuge, the first book solely devoted to the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Rauzon shares his extensive, first-hand knowledge of their natural history while providing an engaging narrative of his travels. Braving seasickness, bad weather, and biting bird ticks, he journeyed from Nihoa to Kure to study and photograph plants and animals for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: rare palms, sharks, turtles, seals, and thousands of birds - finches, terns, petrels, noddies, shearwaters, curlews, boobies, tropic-birds, ducks, and albatrosses, or "gooneys," famed throughout the Pacific for their flying prowess and bizarre breeding rituals."--BOOK JACKET.
  

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Contents

III
IV
5
V
12
VI
20
VIII
25
IX
34
X
42
XII
50
XXV
108
XXVII
118
XXIX
128
XXX
140
XXXII
145
XXXIII
154
XXXIV
162
XXXV
172

XIV
62
XVI
71
XVIII
76
XX
82
XXII
92
XXIII
96
XXXVII
180
XXXVIII
185
XXXIX
189
XL
197
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 1 - Ua Mau Ke Ea O Ka Aina I Ka Pono The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness Bird: Nene (Hawaiian goose) Flower: Red hibiscus Song: "Hawaii Ponoi" Tree: Kukui (candlenut) THE LAND Area: 6,459 sq.
Page 2 - The protected species zone is 50 run from the center geographical positions of Nihoa Island, Necker Island, French Frigate Shoals, Gardner Pinnacles, Maro Reef, Laysan Island, Lisianski Island, Pearl and Hermes Reef, Midway Islands, and Kure Island, as defined in 660.12.
Page 8 - Mears (34, pp. 359, 360) writes: This island, or rock, bears the form of a saddle, high at each end, and low in the middle. To the south it is covered with verdure; but on the north, west, and east sides it is a barren rock, perpendicularly steep, and does not appear to be accessible but to the feathery race, with which it abounds. It was therefore named Bird Island. Corney (11, p. 73) in the bark Columbia, with 60 native Hawaiians on board, passed Nihoa on April 17, 1817: Next day we passed Mokoo...

References to this book

About the author (2001)

Rauzon is a biologist, author, and photographer. He has traveled widely throughout the Pacific, studying birds and developing conservation plans.

Bibliographic information