A Manual of Anthropology: Or, Science of Man, Based on Modern Research (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1871 - Anthropology - 358 pages
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Page 247 - And what if all of animated nature Be but organic harps diversely framed, That tremble into thought, as o'er them sweeps Plastic and vast, one intellectual breeze, At once the Soul of each, and God of all?
Page 241 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground; Another race the following spring supplies; They fall successive, and successive rise: So generations in their course decay; So flourish these, when those are pass'd away.
Page 231 - No more ? A monster then, a dream, A discord. Dragons of the prime, That tare each other in their slime, Were mellow music match'd with him.
Page 60 - Is it not extraordinary ? when among men, I have no evil thoughts, no malice, no spleen; I feel free to speak or to be silent; I can listen, and from every one I can learn ; my hands are in my pockets, I am free from all suspicion, and comfortable. When I am among women, I have evil thoughts, malice, spleen ; I cannot speak, or be silent ; I am full of suspicions, and therefore listen to nothing ; I am in a hurry to be gone.
Page 195 - These angels and men, thus predestinated and foreordained, are particularly and unchangeably designed ; and their number is so certain and definite, that it cannot be either increased or diminished.
Page 209 - Besides these two places for souls separated from their bodies, the Scripture acknowledgeth none.
Page 253 - Where nothing is, but all things seem. And we the shadows of the dream, It is a modest creed, and yet Pleasant if one considers it, To own that death itself must be. Like all the rest, a mockery. That garden sweet, that lady fair, And all sweet shapes and odours there. In truth have never passed away: Tis we, 'tis ours, are changed; not they. For love, and beauty, and delight, There is no death nor change; their might Exceeds our organs, which endure No light, being themselves obscure.
Page 335 - Then sawest thou that this fair Universe, were it in the meanest province thereof, is in very deed the star-domed City of God ; that through every star, through every grassblade, and most through every Living Soul, the glory of a present God still beams. But Nature, which is the Time-vesture of God, and reveals Him to the wise, hides Him from the foolish.
Page 217 - The rest of mankind God was pleased, according to the unsearchable counsel of his own will, (whereby he extendeth or withholdeth mercy, as he pleaseth, for the glory of his sovereign power over his creatures,) to pass by, and to ordain them to dishonour and wrath for their sin, to the praise of his glorious justice.
Page 193 - Whosoever will be saved, before all things it is necessary that he hold the catholic faith.

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