The Calumet of the Coteau: And Other Poetical Legends of the Border (Google eBook)

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J. B. Lippincott & Company, 1883 - Indians of North America - 275 pages
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Page 244 - Coulter's Hell was a standing camp-fire jest upon now well-known realities, for many years, even long after I was first upon the Lower Yellowstone." How far back can the phrase, Coulter's Hell, be traced ? That pair of words, well followed up, may be a clew to mysteries in Park discovery that are still labyrinthine. Again, Mr. Koch spells the name of Captain Clark with a final e. Here is a clear orthographical mistake. No such final letter is...
Page 244 - ... average altitude probably exceeds that of Yellowstone Lake, which is some 8,000 feet, or nearly a half mile higher than Mount Washington. Its few yawning, ever difficult, often impassable, canon-approaches along foaming torrents; the superstitious awe inspired by the hissing springs, sulphur basins, and spouting geysers; and the infrequent visits of the surrounding pagan Indians have combined to singularly delay the exploration of this truly mystic land. Although Lewis and Clarke, by ascending...
Page 244 - ... elsewhere in nature and unrivalled by art. " Many hot springs and mineral streams now petrify timber or coat it with sparkling lime or silica, build geyser cones and many beautiful forms of crystallization, but they are all clearly distinct, and mainly much inferior to those of the closing eruptive period. This wonderful region is really less one large park than a group of smaller ones, partially or wholly isolated, upon both sides of the continental divide, much lower in the park than the nearly...
Page 260 - Norris described how the activities of construction workers led to the naming of the springs: "[D]uring a Sabbath's rest and bathing recreation, some of the boys crossed from our camp to the attractive bordered pools below this great boiling fountain, and in one cool enough for bathing discovered its matchless cleansing properties, and from the long line of brightcolored clothing soon seen drying upon the adjacent stumps and branches, while their owners were gamboling like dolphins in the pools,...
Page 252 - Land oí earth, I would say, leisurely ascend the terraced slopes of Mount Washburn, and from its oval summit, with throbbing heart but fearless eye and soul expanding, look around you. One day thus spent would more, adequately impress the mind with the magnitude and marvels of the Park, and the vast amount of exploration and research necessary in...
Page 247 - ... since been made. AREA OF THE PARK. Two matters in connection with the Yellowstone National Park tend to great and general misapprehension regarding it. These are, first, its name, and, second, its area, or, as perhaps best treated, inversely. The United States maps and authorities show it to be an oblong square, 62 miles in length from north to south, and 54 miles in width from east to west, containing 3348 square miles. The tenth census of the United States shows that the area of the State of...
Page 245 - River and Madison route to Virginia City. When among the fingers of the Yellowstone Lake, Everts lost his way, horse, arms, and provisions, and after thirty-seven days of exposure, starvation, and suffering, doubtless unequaled by any other man now living, was found by...
Page 244 - ... and many beautiful forms of crystallization, but they are all clearly distinct, and mainly much inferior to those of the closing eruptive period. This wonderful region is really less one large park than a group of smaller ones, partially or wholly isolated, upon both sides of the continental divide, much lower in the park than the nearly unbroken surrounding mountain ranges. Its average altitude probably exceeds that of Yellowstone Lake, which is some 8,000 feet or nearly a half mile higher than...
Page 251 - Park, which each road as they near it, will increase accessibility, and will soon invite a healthy competition for the patronage of tourists in making a cheap, rapid, and easy visit to the Wonder Land ; planning it as the turning point, as well as the main region of attraction, in a season's ramble for health and enjoyment. Should these anticipations be realized a visit to the Park will become national in character and popular with our people, so that ere long the flush of shame will tinge the cheeks...
Page 252 - Creeks, to go into camp, and await the dawn of a cloudless summer's morning. Then, to the scientist, the artist, or the poet, and to the weary and worn pilgrims of health and pleasure, from our own and other lands, ardent to secure the acme of mountain-climbing enjoyment, or in viewing the lovely parks and yawning canons, the crests of glistening ice and vales of blistering brimstone, the records of fire and flood, the evidences of marvelous eruptions and erosions of the present and the past, and...

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