Howl: Original Draft Facsimile, Transcript, and Variant Versions, Fully Annotated by Author, with Contemporaneous Correspondence, Account of First Public Reading, Legal Skirmishes, Presursor Texts, and Bibliography

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HarperCollins, Oct 10, 2006 - Poetry - 208 pages
16 Reviews

First published in 1956, Allen Ginsberg's Howl is a prophetic masterpiece—an epic raging against dehumanizing society that overcame censorship trials and obscenity charges to become one of the most widely read poems of the century. This annotated version of Ginsberg's classic is the poet's own re-creation of the revolutionary work's composition process—as well as a treasure trove of anecdotes, an intimate look at the poet's writing techniques, and a veritable social history of the 1950s.

  

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Review: Howl: Original Draft Facsimile

User Review  - Eva Sanchez - Goodreads

Yes. Read full review

Review: Howl: Original Draft Facsimile

User Review  - Camille Mccarthy - Goodreads

I really enjoyed this poem, even though I really disliked "On the Road" and they have a very similar style. I think this is because "Howl" is a lot more profound and it seemed to have a very clear ... Read full review

Contents

FOR CARL SOLOMON
3
Selected Facsimiles and Transcripts
9
Carl Solomon Speaks
109
Authors Annotations
121
Appendixes
147
First Reading at the Six Gallery October 7 1955
165
Bibliography of Howl by Bill Morgan
189
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Allen Ginsberg was born in Newark, New Jersey, in 1926, a son of Naomi and lyric poet Louis Ginsberg. As a student at Columbia College in the 1940s, he began a close friendship with William Burroughs, Neal Cassady, and Jack Kerouac, and he later became associated with the Beat movement and the San Francisco Renaissance in the 1950s. After jobs as a laborer, sailor, and market researcher, Ginsberg published his first volume of poetry, Howl and Other Poems, in 1956. "Howl" defeated censorship trials to become one of the most widely read poems of the century, translated into more than twenty-two languages, from Macedonian to Chinese, a model for younger generations of poets from West to East.

Ginsberg was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, was awarded the medal of Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French minister of culture, was a winner of the National Book Award (for The Fall of America), and was a cofounder of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at the Naropa Institute, the first accredited Buddhist college in the Western world. He died in New York City in 1997.

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