The World's Water 2006-2007: The Biennial Report on Freshwater Resources (Google eBook)

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Island Press, Mar 5, 2013 - Science - 392 pages
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Produced biennially, The World's Water provides a timely examination of the key issues surrounding freshwater resources and their use. Each new volume identifies and explains the most significant current trends worldwide, and offers the best data available on a variety of water-related topics. The 2006-2007 volume features overview chapters on:•Water and terrorism •Business risks of water •Water and ecosystems •Floods and droughts •Desalination •Environmental justice and water
The book contains an updated chronology of global conflicts associated with water as well as an assessment of recent water conferences, including the 4th World Water Forum. It also offers a brief review of issues surrounding the use of bottled water and the possible existence of water on Mars. From one of the world's leading authorities on water issues, The World's Water is the most comprehensive and up-to-date source of information and analysis on freshwater resources and the political, economic, scientific, and technological issues associated with them.
  

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I've just gone through "Time to Rethink Large International Water Meetings" of this book.
This chapter has made me think of quite similar situations in which other sectoral or cross-cutting issues
are being discussed recently.
For one of those who have been involved in continual feelings of less fulfilment despite the numbers of events we have been organising or participating in, I've found the chapter informative with respect to showing that same concerns have already been shared.
According to the Chapter, Salman (2003, 2004) offers history of large international water meetings. This further took me to a question: Why are we still continuing to have large meetings with substantially unchanged formats, which the Chapter judges as ineffective?
The Chapter also seems to have offered me good insights into how to improve the situation that I've been experiencing; or how I could approach this issue to solve.
By further studying the historical discourse regarding the increasing large international meetings, I may be able to at least capture the reality, and to hopefully come up with practical alternatives to replace the current situation.
 

Contents

FOUR
1
Water Allocations
29
Water Indicators and Indices
37
TWO Water and Human Health
39
FIVE
45
THREE The Status of Large Dams The End of an Era?
69
A Case Study of Residential
101
AWord About Agricultural Water Use
107
WATER BRIEFS
193
Two Steps Forward One Step
204
Five The Soft Path in Verse
219
Three The Water and Climate Bibliography
228
Water Conflict Chronology
234
Data Table 3 Access to Safe Drinking Water by Country
237
Data Table 5 Access to Water Supply and Sanitation by Region
256
DATA SECTION
257

FIVE Pacific Island Developing Country Water Resources
113
Indoor Residential Summary
118
Residential Outdoor Water Use Summary
125
The Case of
133
What Next?
149
SEVEN Climate Change and California Water Resources
157
Three
169
WATER BRIEFS
173
Water Conflict Chronology
189
Data Table 2 Freshwater Withdrawals by Country and Sector
263
Data Table 8 Twenty Largest Per Capita Recipients of ODA for Water
270
Data Table 13 Per Capita Bottled Water Consumption by Country
284
Data Table 16 Irrigated Area by Region 1961 to 2003
298
Data Table 21 100 Largest Desalination Plants Planned in Construction
310
COMPREHENSIVE TABLE OF CONTENTS
341
Conclusions 126
361
Copyright

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Page 4 - Investigation (FBI) defines terrorism as the unlawful use of force or violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a Government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of political or social objectives...

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About the author (2013)

Peter H. Gleick is president of the Pacific Institute for Studies in Development, Environment, and Security in Oakland, California, and is a recipient of the prestigious MacArthur Felloship for his work on water issues.

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