Communications Policy in Transition: The Internet and Beyond

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Benjamin M. Compaine, Shane M. Greenstein
MIT Press, 2001 - Computers - 425 pages
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Until the 1980s, it was presumed that technical change in most communications services could easily be monitored from centralized state and federal agencies. This presumption was long outdated prior to the commercialization of the Internet. With the Internet, the long-forecast convergence of voice, video, and text bits became a reality. Legislation, capped by the Telecommunications Act of 1996, created new quasi-standards such as "fair" and "reasonable" for the FCC and courts to apply, leading to nonstop litigation and occasional gridlock.This book addresses some of the many telecommunications areas on which public policy makers, corporate strategists, and social activists must reach agreement. Topics include the regulation of access, Internet architecture in a commercial era, communications infrastructure development, the Digital Divide, and information policy issues such as intellectual property and the retransmission of TV programming via the Internet.

  

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Contents

Broadband Architectures ISP Business Plans and Open
35
Regulatory Treatment of IP Transport and Services
59
The EndtoEnd Arguments
91
Policy Implications of the Internet Architecture
141
The Potential for Scrutiny of Internet Peering Policies
159
Comparing the United States
195
State and Local
221
Competition and CrossSubsidy
241
What Children
265
Accessibility of Broadband Telecommunications Services by Various
295
Reexamining the Digital Divide
321
Sorting Out the Search Engine Market
351
Copyright in the Age of Distributed Applications
369
Should Congress Establish a Compulsory License for Internet Video
397
Index
417
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Shane Greenstein is Elinor and Wendall Hobbs Professor of Management and Strategy at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University.

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