Salisbury, Norwich, and Oxford (Google eBook)

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and T. Longman, Jun., Paternoster Row ; and the author, Burton Street, 1836 - Cathedrals
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Page 45 - Another while, the Sheriff Toftes and Alderman Linsey, attended with many zealous followers, came into my chapel to look for superstitious pictures and relics of idolatry; and sent for me, to let me know they found those windows full of images, which were very offensive, and must be demolished.
Page 201 - AngKcaiue ; or, an Essay towards deducing a regular Succession of all the principal Dignitaries in each Cathedral, Collegiate Church, or Chapel (now in being), in those Parts of Great Britain called England and Wales, from the first Erection thereof to the present Year 1715 ; containing...
Page 18 - Malmesbury, for there he erected extensive edifices at vast cost, and with surpassing beauty, the courses of stone being so correctly laid that the joint deceives the eye, and leads it to imagine that the whole wall is composed of a single block.
Page 42 - Lord, what work was here ! what clattering of glasses ! what beating down of walls ! what tearing up of monuments ! what pulling down of seats ! what wresting out of irons and brass from the windows and graves ! what defacing of arms ! what demolishing of curious stone-work, that had not any representation in the world, but only of the cost of the founder, and skill of the mason...
Page 19 - The bishops, the bishops themselves, I blush to affirm it, yet not all, but many, (and he particularises the bishops of Winchester, Lincoln, and Chester,) bound in iron, and completely furnished with arms, were accustomed to mount war-horses with the perverters of their country, to participate in their prey; to expose to bonds and torture the knights whom they took in the chance of war, or whom they met full of money ; and while they themselves were the head and cause of so much wickedness and enormity,...
Page 17 - Salisbury, on whose advice he principally relied. For, before his accession, he had made him regulator of his household, and on becoming king, having had proof of his abilities, appointed him first chancellor and then a bishop. The able discharge of his episcopal functions led to a hope that he might be deserving of a higher office. He therefore committed to his care the administration of the whole kingdom, whether he might himself be resident in England or absent in Normandy.
Page 17 - ... him the duty of obedience. Henry was extremely eager to effect this, aware that Roger would faithfully perform every thing for his advantage. Nor did he deceive the royal expectation; but conducted himself with so much integrity and diligence, that not a spark of envy was kindled against him. Moreover, the king was frequently detained in Normandy, sometimes for three, sometimes four years, and sometimes for a longer period; and on his return to his kingdom, he gave credit to the chancellor's...
Page 120 - Sarum, and the houses which latterly belonged to the Bishop and Canons of the said church, within our Castle of Old Sarum, to have and to hold, as our gift, for the improvement of the church of New Sarum, and the close thereunto belonging.
Page 42 - Greenyard pulpit, and the service-books and singing-books that could be had, were carried to the fire in the public market-place; a lewd wretch walking before the train, in his cope trailing in the dirt, with a service-book in his hand, imitating in an impious scorn the tune, and usurping the words of the litany used formerly in the church.
Page 17 - Ralph, William, and lastly the pope, enjoined him the duty of obedience. Henry was extremely eager to effect this, aware that Roger would faithfully perform every thing for his advantage. Nor did he deceive the royal expectation ; but conducted himself with so much integrity and diligence, that not a spark of envy was kindled against him. Moreover, the king was frequently detained in Normandy, sometimes for three, sometimes four years, and sometimes for a longer period ; and on his return to his...