A Guide to Government in Afghanistan (Google eBook)

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Anne Evans, Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit
World Bank Publications, Jan 1, 2004 - Reference - 160 pages
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A Guide to Government in Afghanistan has three objectives: i) it seeks to provide newcomers to the administrative and political scene in Afghanistan with a basic guide to the structures and processes of government; ii) it intends to provide reformers with some understanding of how to work "with the grain" of the existing institutional arrangements; and iii) it seeks to pay tribute to the remarkable people who have kept the system running and who are now reforming it. In pursuing these objectives, this guide attempts to set out the underlying strengths of the public sector, describing the evolution of the Afghan state, the current political context, and the administrative and organizational components of the government. It sets out the legal basis and organizational responsibilities for key fiscal tasks including revenue collection, budget preparation and execution, and accounting and audit. It also describes the organizational structures in the provinces, the way in which the staffing establishment is determined, and the structure of pay and grading. In particular, it looks at the arrangements for service delivery in the education and health sectors. The guide draws the bulk of its material from six provincial case studies: Faryab and Herat, undertaken in November 2002; Badakhshan and Wardak, in April 2003, Kandahar in June 2003, and finally Bamyan in July 2003. The paper has also benefited from additional research undertaken by the Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU) and the World Bank.
  

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Page xvi - UNHCR United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees UNICEF United Nations Children's Fund...
Page xvi - MoE Ministry of Education MoF Ministry of Finance MoFA Ministry of Foreign Affairs MoH Ministry of Health Mol Ministry of Interior MoLSA Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs MoPH Ministry of Public Health...
Page 158 - ... contained in this agreement, and b/ with the exception of those provisions relating to the monarchy and to the executive and legislative bodies provided in the Constitution; and (ii) existing laws and regulations, to the extent that they are not inconsistent with this agreement or with international legal obligations to which Afghanistan is a party, or with those applicable provisions contained in the Constitution of 1964, provided that the Interim Authority shall have the power to repeal or...
Page xvi - UNOPS United Nations Office for Project Services USAID United States Agency for International Development WB World Bank WFP World Food...
Page 158 - Constitution referred to above: i) The Constitution of 1964, a/ to the extent that its provisions are not inconsistent with those contained in this agreement, and b/ with the exception of those provisions relating to the monarchy and to the executive and legislative bodies provided in the Constitution; and ii) existing laws and regulations, to the extent that they are not inconsistent with this agreement or with international legal obligations to which Afghanistan is a party, or with those applicable...
Page xi - civil servants" is used in a much more limited sense than "public servants" and is limited to core central public employment, ie employees in the central executive and legislative administration, in departments directly dependent on the Head of State or the Parliament, together with all other ministries and administrative departments of central government, including autonomous agencies paid by central government. Instead of "civil service...
Page 8 - Art. 109. In each province a Provincial Council shall be formed. The members of the Provincial Council shall be elected by the residents of the province in a free, universal, direct and secret election.
Page 3 - In sum, the weakest link in the government chain of command was between the subprovincial administration and the villages, where the government was faced with indigenous political structures and where its own agents were not well respected.
Page 18 - Terrorists take a cut as well... the longer this happens, the greater the threat to security within the country and on its borders.
Page 3 - Pashtuns from the south - and they were frequently transferred to prevent them developing personal power bases. As a result, they had little knowledge of the areas under their jurisdiction, and they had little interest in creating close ties with local leaders. In addition, administrative distance was encouraged by the centralized government organization. All major decisions were referred to higher officials in Kabul. All provincial recruitment...

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About the author (2004)

tim+anne evans love marriage. For thirty-eight years they have passionately explored the miracle and mystery of "two becoming one" in the context of God's original marriage design.They are parents, grandparents, pastoral counselors, ordained ministers, and spiritual parents. Together they lead REAL LIFE Ministries full time.

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