A River and Its City: The Nature of Landscape in New Orleans (Google eBook)

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University of California Press, 2003 - History - 296 pages
2 Reviews
This engaging environmental history explores the rise, fall, and rebirth of one of the nation's most important urban public landscapes, and more significantly, the role public spaces play in shaping people's relationships with the natural world. Ari Kelman focuses on the battles fought over New Orleans's waterfront, examining the link between a river and its city and tracking the conflict between public and private control of the river. He describes the impact of floods, disease, and changing technologies on New Orleans's interactions with the Mississippi. Considering how the city grew distant culturally and spatially from the river, this book argues that urban areas provide a rich source for understanding people's connections with nature, and in turn, nature's impact on human history.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Fjumonvi - LibraryThing

The following review originally appeared in The Southeastern Librarian, Vol. 52, No. 1 (Spring 2004), p. 45. This is the story of a relationship. Like many relationships, it is complex, multi-faceted ... Read full review

Review: A River and Its City: The Nature of Landscape in New Orleans

User Review  - Tom - Goodreads

Excellent academic account of how New Orleans was shaped by its geographic site on the Mississippi River - politically, environmentally, and literally. Plenty of well-told stories likely to amaze local history fans. Read full review

Contents

IV
1
V
19
VI
50
VII
87
VIII
119
IX
157
X
197
XI
223
XII
253
XIII
273
Copyright

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Page 260 - THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES IN MAINTAINING THE PUBLIC RIGHT TO THE BEACH OF THE MISSISSIPPI, ADJACENT TO NEW ORLEANS, AGAINST THE INTRUSION OF EDWARD LIVINGSTON.
Page 260 - An answer to Mr. Jefferson's Justification of his conduct in the case of the New Orleans Batture by Edward Livingston (1813), in Hall's American Law Journal, Vol.
Page 260 - Orleans; the Memoire of Mr. Derbigny; an Examination of the Title of the United States; the Opinion of Counsel thereon; and a Number of Other Documents.

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About the author (2003)

Ari Kelmanis Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Davis.

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