U. S. Industrial Outlook, 1994 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
DIANE Publishing, Feb 1, 1994 - 660 pages
2 Reviews
Highlights U.S. industrial activities and features: economic assumptions; recent financial performance of U.S. manufacturing corporations; the U.S. export boom and economic growth; highlights of the 1993 U.S. outlook; the top 50 trade events in 1993; Dept. of Commerce competitive assessments; industry reviews; trade finance; educational training; and forecasts. Also lists industry analysts by name with a phone number.
  

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Contents

INTERNATIONAL ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION
5-11
Wood Products
6-1
LOGGING
6-2
LUMBER
6-3
MILLWORK
6-4
HARDWOOD VENEER AND PLYWOOD
6-5
SOFTWOOD PLYWOOD AND VENEER
6-7
RECONSTITUTED PANEL PRODUCTS
6-8
Construction Materials
7-1
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL
7-4
CEMENT
7-5
FLAT GLASS
7-7
GYPSUM PRODUCTS
7-9
CERAMIC TILE
7-10
PLUMBING PRODUCTS
7-11
Electric Lighting and Wiring Equipment
7-13
NONCURRENT CARRYING WIRING DEVICES
7-14
Textiles
9-1
YARN SPINNING MILLS
9-3
BROADWOVEN AND KNIT FABRICS
9-4
FLOORCOVERING MILLS
9-6
MANMADE FIBERS
9-8
Paper and Allied Products
10-1
PULP MILLS
10-5
PAPER AND PAPERBOARD MILLS
10-6
CORRUGATED AND SOLID FIBER BOXES
10-9
FOLDING PAPERBOARD BOXES
10-10
SANITARY PAPER PRODUCTS
10-12
ENVELOPES
10-14
Chemicals and Allied Products
11-1
REGULATIONS IN THE CHEMICAL INDUSTRY
11-3
ORGANIC CHEMICALS
11-5
INORGANIC CHEMICALS
11-7
PAINTS AND COATINGS
11-10
ADHESIVES AND SEALANTS
11-12
FERTILIZERS
11-13
Plastics and Rubber
12-1
PLASTIC PRODUCTS
12-2
SYNTHETIC RUBBER
12-3
RUBBER PRODUCTS
12-4
FABRICATED RUBBER PRODUCTS
12-6
Metals
13-1
ALUMINUM
13-4
LEAD
13-8
TITANIUM
13-11
ZINC
13-12
General Components
14-1
INDUSTRIAL FASTENERS
14-3
VALVES AND PIPE FITTINGS
14-4
BALL AND ROLLER BEARINGS
14-6
Components and Equipment and Superconductors
15-1
SEMICONDUCTORS AND RELATED DEVICES
15-3
PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS
15-11
PASSIVE COMPONENTS
15-16
SEMICONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING EQUIPMENT
15-20
SUPERCONDUCTIVE DEVICES
15-23
Metalworking Equipment
16-1
MACHINE TOOLS
16-2
METAL CUTTING TOOLS
16-4
ROBOTICS
16-5
POWER DRIVEN HAND TOOLS
16-7
WELDING APPARATUS
16-8
Production Machinery
17-1
MINING MACHINERY
17-3
OIL AND GAS FIELD MACHINERY
17-4
TEXTILE MACHINERY
17-6
FARM MACHINERY
17-7
PACKAGING MACHINERY
17-10
PAPER INDUSTRIES MACHINERY
17-11
AIR CONDITIONING REFRIGERATION AND HEATING EQUIPMENT
17-13
PRINTING TRADES MACHINERY
17-15
FOOD PRODUCTS MACHINERY
17-16
and Renewable Energy Equipment
18-1
MOTORS AND GENERATORS
18-3
INDUSTRIAL CONTROLS
18-4
RENEWABLE ENERGY ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
18-5
WIND ENERGY
18-6
BIOMASS ENERGY
18-7
SMALL HYDRO ENERGY
18-9
Environmental Technologies and Services
19-1
AIR POLLUTION CONTROL SECTOR
19-2
WATER AND WASTEWATER SECTOR
19-3
SOLID WASTERECYCLING
19-4
DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES
19-7
Aerospace
20-1
AIRCRAFT
20-6
MISSILES AND SPACE LAUNCH VEHICLES
20-11
Shipbuilding and Repair
21-1
Industrial and Analytical Instruments
22-1
INSTRUMENTS AND OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS AND LENSES
22-2
MEASURING AND CONTROLLING INSTRUMENTS
22-5
MEASURING AND CONTROLLING DEVICES
22-7
INSTRUMENTS TO MEASURE ELECTRICITY
22-8
Photographic Equipment and Supplies
23-1
Printing and Publishing
24-1
NEWSPAPERS
24-2
Computer Equipment
26-1
SUPERCOMPUTERS
26-8
MAINFRAMES
26-11
MIDRANGE
26-12
WORKSTATIONS
26-13
PERSONAL COMPUTERS
26-16
PORTABLE COMPUTERS
26-21
DISK STORAGE
26-23
Computer Software and Networking
27-1
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
27-9
CADCAMCAE
27-11
NETWORKING
27-13
Space Commerce
27-17
Telecommunications Services
29-1
CELLULAR AND RADIO SERVICES
29-11
SATELLITE SERVICES
29-15
Equipment
30-1
NETWORK EQUIPMENT
30-3
CUSTOMER PREMISES EQUIPMENT
30-4
CELLULAR RADIOTELEPHONE SYSTEMS
30-6
WIRELESS PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS
30-10
MICROWAVE RADIO SYSTEMS
30-11
FIBER OPTICS
30-14
SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS
30-18
SEARCH AND NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT
30-22
Entertainment
31-1
MUSIC
31-3
VIDEO CASSETTES
31-4
CABLE TELEVISION
31-6
Apparel and Fabricated Textile Products
32-1
Cleaning Preparations and Cosmetics
33-1
COSMETICS
33-2
POLISHES AND SANITATION GOODS
33-3
SURFACE ACTIVE AGENTS
33-4
Other Consumer Nondurables
34-1
SHOES AND SLIPPERS
34-5
LUGGAGE AND PERSONAL LEATHER GOODS
34-9
FOOD AND BEVERAGES
34-11
Motor Vehicles and Parts
35-1
PASSENGER CARS AND LIGHT TRUCKS
35-5
MEDIUMDUTY AND HEAVYDUTY TRUCKS
35-16
TRUCK TRAILERS
35-21
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS AND ACCESSORIES
35-22
FRANCHISED NEW CAR DEALERSHIPS
35-28
Household Consumer Durables
36-1
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE
36-4
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES
36-9
LAWN AND GARDEN EQUIPMENT
36-11
CONSUMER ELECTRONICS
36-14
Personal Consumer Durables
37-1
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
37-4
BICYCLES
37-6
MOTORCYCLES
37-9
BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING
37-11
SPORTING AND ATHLETIC GOODS
37-13
DOLLS TOYS GAMES AND CHILDRENS VEHICLES
37-17
Wholesaling
37-23
Retailing
39-1
Transportation
40-1
RAILROADS
40-4
PASSENGER SERVICE
40-7
TRUCKING
40-9
driver training testing vehicle inspection and other safetyre WATER TRANSPORTATION
40-13
DOMESTIC SHIPPING
40-16
Travel Services
41-1
Health and Medical Services
42-1
Drugs
43-1
MEDICINALS AND BOTANICALS
43-3
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
43-4
DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES
43-5
Medical and Dental Instruments and Supplies
44-1
SURGICAL AND MEDICAL INSTRUMENTS
44-6
SURGICAL APPLIANCES AND SUPPLIES
44-7
DENTAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES INDUSTRY
44-8
XRAY APPARATUS AND TUBES
44-11
ELECTROMEDICAL EQUIPMENT
44-12
OPHTHALMIC GOODS
44-14
Financial Services
45-1
COMMERCIAL BANKING
45-2
SAVINGS INSTITUTIONS
45-5
CREDIT UNIONS
45-7
TRADE FINANCE
45-9
Securities Industry
46-1
MUTUAL FUNDS
46-5
VENTURE CAPITAL
46-7
Commodity Futures Trading
47-1
Insurance
48-1
PROPERTYCASUALTY INSURANCE
48-3
Equipment Leasing
48-11
Education and Training Services
48-15
Professional Services
51-1
ACCOUNTING AUDITING AND BOOKKEEPING
51-2
LEGAL SERVICES
51-3
MANAGEMENT AND PUBLIC RELATIONS SERVICES
51-4
ADVERTISING
51-5

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 24-17 - Section, Division of Research and Statistics, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Washington, DC 20551. Transaction category, or sector 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 19 76 19 77 19 7В 1 Total funds advanced in credit markets to HI H2 HI H2 HI...
Page 4 - Gross national product (GNP) The value of all goods and services produced in a country plus income earned in foreign countries less income payable to foreign sources.
Page 11-4 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act The Resource Conservation And Recovery Act (RCRA...
Page 27-16 - Aviation Week & Space Technology, 1221 Avenue of the Americas. New York, NY 10020.
Page 2-3 - ... block of coal, known as a panel, leaving no support pillars within the panel area. Panel dimensions vary over time and with mining conditions but currently average about 900 feet wide (coal face width) and more than 8,000 feet long (the minable extent of the panel, measured in direction of mining). Longwall mining is done under movable roof supports that are advanced as the bed is cut. The roof in the mined-out area is allowed to fall as the mining advances.
Page 27-5 - Trade Representative") shall identify (1) those foreign countries that (A) deny adequate and effective protection of intellectual property rights, or (B) deny fair and equitable market access to United States persons that rely upon intellectual property protection...
Page 5 - Value added: The difference between the value of goods produced and the cost of materials and services purchased to produce them. It includes wages, interest, rent, and profits. The sum of value added of all sectors of the economy equals GDP. Voluntary restraint agreement (VRA): An import relief device to limit foreign trade in a particular commodity to protect domestic industry from injury by foreign competition. Sometimes referred to as a "voluntary export restraint" or an "orderly marketing agreement.
Page 4 - EC are Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, and the United Kingdom.
Page 35-4 - ... billion, compared with a $1 billion surplus in 1990. The United States exported more automotive parts than motor vehicles ($21.8 billion vs. $17 billion) in 1992, while importing more vehicles than parts ($61.1 billion vs. $19.5 billion). As has been the case for many years, most of the automotive deficit is the result of trade with Canada and Mexico where GM, Ford, and Chrysler operate plants producing vehicles for the US market and with Japan. Exports of both vehicles and parts are...
Page 27-19 - Agriculture; the activities of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the Department of Commerce...

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