The Plains Sioux and U.S. Colonialism from Lewis and Clark to Wounded Knee

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 5, 2004 - History - 387 pages
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Through the interpretive lens of colonial theory, Jeffrey Ostler presents an original analysis of the tumultuous relationship between the Plains Sioux and the United States in the 1800s. He provides novel insights on well-known aspects of the Sioux story, such as the Oregon Trail, the deaths of "Crazy Horse" and "Sitting Bull", and the Ghost Dance, and offers an in-depth look at many lesser-known facets of Sioux history and culture. Paying close attention to Sioux perspectives of their history, the book demonstrates how the Sioux creatively responded to the challenges of U.S. expansion and domination, revealing simultaneously how U.S. power increasingly limited the autonomy of their communities as the century came to a close. Ostler's innovative analysis of the Plains Sioux culminates in a compelling reinterpretation of the events that led to the Wounded Knee massacre of December 29, 1890. History Department Head at the University of Oregon, Associate Professor Jeffrey Ostler has held honors such as the National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship and has published articles in Western Historical Quarterly, Great Plains Quarterly, and Pacific Historical Review.
  

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Review: The Plains Sioux and US Colonialism from Lewis and Clark to Wounded Knee (Cambridge Studies in North American Indian History)

User Review  - Iris - Goodreads

This book is amazing. I have to say though that makes it really hard for me to swallow all the abuse and injustices Native Americans went through. A must read. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Colonialism Agency and Power
1
Vilest Miscreants of the Savage Race The Plains Sioux in an Empire of Liberty
13
Futile Efforts to Subjugate Them Failures of Conquest
40
Doubtless an Unauthorized Promise The Politics of the Great Sioux War
63
Force Is the Only Thing The Killing of Crazy Horse
85
We Were Raised in This Country Claiming Place
109
I Work So Much it Makes Me Poor The Reservation Economy
128
Just as Well with My Hair on Colonial Education
149
Enough to Crush Us Down Struggles for Land
217
When the Earth Shakes Do Not Be Afraid The Ghost Dance as an Anticolonial Movement
243
To Bring My People Back into the Hoop The Development of the Lakota Ghost Dance
264
The Most Serious Indian War of Our History The Armys Invasion
289
If He Fights Destroy Him The Road to Wounded Knee
313
A Valley of Death Wounded Knee
338
After Wounded Knee
361
Index
371

All Men Are Different The Politics of Religion and Culture
169
Great Trouble and Bad Feeling Government Agents and Sioux Leaders
194

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About the author (2004)

Jeffrey Ostler is Associate Professor of History at the University of Oregon. He is the author of articles in such scholarly journals as Western Historical Quarterly, Great Plains Quarterly, and Pacific Historical Review.