On the Origin of Species: By Means of Natural Selection, Or, the Preservation of Favored Races in the Struggle for Life (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Appleton, 1883 - Evolution - 458 pages
480 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
213
4 stars
123
3 stars
102
2 stars
26
1 star
16

Just thick prose, and nothing all that interesting yet. - Goodreads
This was hard to read. - Goodreads
And his writing style is not concise or easy to follow. - Goodreads
Beautiful insight, and many illustrative examples. - Goodreads
Very difficult to read, however interesting. - Goodreads
He then moves on to explain natural selection. - Goodreads

Review: The Origin of Species

User Review  - E Stanton - Goodreads

I started this book several months ago. I started "The City of God" by St. Augustine of Hippo at the same time, but I'm only halfway through that. (5th century theological philosophy is interesting ... Read full review

Review: The Origin of Species

User Review  - Lorna - Goodreads

Very interesting and worth reading... Read full review

Contents

I
5
II
33
III
48
IV
62
V
106
VI
133
VII
168
VIII
205
IX
235
X
264
XI
290
XII
316
XIII
343
XIV
363
XV
404

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 65 - It may be said that natural selection is daily and hourly scrutinising, throughout the world, every variation, even the slightest; rejecting that which is bad, preserving and adding up all that is good; silently and insensibly working, whenever and wherever opportunity offers, at the improvement of each organic being in relation to its organic and inorganic conditions of life.
Page 104 - The green and budding twigs may represent existing species, and those produced during former years may represent the long succession of extinct species. At each period of growth all the growing twigs have tried to branch out on all sides, and to overtop and kill the surrounding twigs and branches, in the same manner as species and groups of species have at all times overmastered other species in the great battle for life.
Page 57 - Newman, who has long attended to the habits of humble-bees believes that 'more than two-thirds of them are thus destroyed all over England'.
Page 23 - ... that which enables the agriculturist not only to modify the character of his flock, but to change it altogether. It is the magician's wand, by means of which he may summon into life whatever form and mould he pleases.
Page 146 - If it could be demonstrated that any complex organ existed which could not possibly have been formed by numerous, successive, slight modifications, my theory would absolutely break down.
Page 50 - But a plant on the edge of a desert is said to struggle for life against the drought, though more properly it should be said to be dependent on the moisture.
Page 429 - These laws, taken in the largest sense, being Growth with reproduction; Inheritance which is almost implied by reproduction; Variability from the indirect and direct action of the conditions of life, and from use and disuse...
Page 104 - The limbs divided into great branches, and these into lesser and lesser branches, were themselves once, when the tree was young, budding twigs; and this connection of the former and present buds, by ramifying branches, may well represent the classification of all extinct and living species in groups subordinate to groups.
Page 425 - Nevertheless all living things have much in common, in their chemical composition, their cellular structure, their laws of growth, and their liability to injurious influences.
Page 2 - ... species had not been independently created, but had descended, like varieties, from other species. Nevertheless, such a conclusion, even if well founded, would be unsatisfactory, until it could be shown how the innumerable species inhabiting this world have been modified so as to acquire that perfection of structure and co-adaptation which justly excites our admiration.

Bibliographic information