The sports and pastimes of the people of England: Including the rural and domestic recreations, May games, mummeries, shows, processions, pageants, and pompous spectacles, from the earliest period to the present time (Google eBook)

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Printed for Thomas Tegg, 1838 - Games - 420 pages
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Page 272 - This might be my lord such-a-one, that praised my lord such-a-one's horse, when he meant to beg it; might it not?
Page 152 - God; we acknowledge thee to be the Lord. All the earth doth worship thee, the Father everlasting. To thee, all Angels cry aloud; the Heavens, and all the Powers therein. To thee, Cherubim and Seraphim continually do cry, Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of Sabaoth; Heaven and earth are full of the Majesty of thy Glory.
Page 158 - The country people flock from all sides, many miles off, to hear and see it ; for they have therein devils and devices, to delight as well the eye as the eare ; the players conne not their parts without booke, but are prompted by one called the ordinary, who followeth at their back with the book in his hand, and telleth them softly what they must pronounce aloud.
Page 399 - What, art mad ? A man may see how this world goes with no eyes. Look with thine ears: see how yond justice rails upon yond simple thief. Hark, in thine ear: change places; and, handy-dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief?
Page 355 - Let Ralph come out on May-day in the morning, and speak upon a conduit, with all his scarfs about him, and his feathers, and his rings, and his knacks.
Page xlix - Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.
Page 288 - Year. When I considered the Fragrancy of the Walks and Bowers, with the Choirs of Birds that sung upon the Trees, and the loose Tribe of People that walked under their Shades, I could not but look upon the Place as a kind of Mahometan Paradise.
Page 353 - On the calends, or the first day of May, commonly called May-day, the juvenile part of both sexes were wont to rise a little after midnight, and walk to some neighbouring wood, accompanied with music and the blowing of horns ; where they break down branches from the trees, and adorn them with nosegays and crowns of flowers.
Page 371 - squire of the parish treats the whole company every year with a hogshead of ale, and proposes a beaver hat as a recompense to him who gives most falls.
Page 166 - Noah and his family coming out of the ark, with all the beasts two by two, and all the fowls of the air seen in a prospect sitting upon...

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