Soil survey of Dane County, Wisconsin, Issue 53 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
The State, 1917 - Soil surveys - 86 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 105 - important since it has to do with the water holding capacity of the soil. It also determines the ease with which a soil can be worked, and has much to do with the crops to which the soil is best adapted. SOIL CLASSES. SOILS CONTAINING LESS THAN 20% SILT AND CLAY Coarse sand.—Over 25%
Page 98 - BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS. Governor of the State. EDWARD A. BIRGE, President. President of the University of Wisconsin. President of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters. JOHN CALLAHAN, Vice-President. State Superintendent of Public Instruction. STAFF OF THE SURVEY, 1920. ADMINISTRATION: William O.
Page 82 - inches for the summer months, and 7.16 inches for the fall. Most of the rainfall occurs just preceding and during the period of plant growth; thus, the growing season—April to September, inclusive—has an average of 20.24 inches, which is as much rain as is received during the same months by eastern Texas, Illinois, Ohio, or eastern New York. Owing to the
Page 125 - tobacco, peas, cabbage and other garden crops are grown and where the acidity is medium from 2 to 3 tons per acre of ground limestone may be used with profit. Where a liberal supply of manure is available the need for lime will not be so great. The second application which
Page 78 - likely to lodge and the quality of the grain is not so good as on the light-colored heavy soils of the county. The grasses appear to do best on the dark-colored soils of heavy texture. Potatoes of the best quality are grown on the sandy and sandy loam types. Local conditions, however, often
Page 125 - of lime will be needed. On parts of the farm where manure cannot be applied the lime can be used with profit on such soils and may be actually necessary for economic production. The greater need will usually be on the higher places, rather than on the lower slopes.
Page 67 - cabbage, or potatoes, or small grains are to be grown, the drainage must be more certain, and over the greater portion of our marsh lands this will mean the installation of drainage systems in the form of either open lateral ditches or of tile not more than 10 and often not more than 5 rods apart on the average.
Page 105 - gravel, coarse and medium sand. Very fine sand.—Over 50% very fine sand. SOILS CONTAINING BETWEEN 20-50% OF SILT AND CLAY Sandy loam.—Over 25% fine gravel, coarse and medium sand. Fine sandy loam.—Over 50%
Page 114 - In the following pages of this report the various soils of Rock County are described in detail and their relation to agriculture is discussed. The distribution of the soils is shown on the accompanying soil map while the table below gives the name and the actual and relative extent of each kind of soil mapped. Soil AREA
Page 69 - to be grown, the drainage must be more certain, and over the greater portion of our marsh lands this will mean the installation of drainage systems in the form of either open lateral ditches or of tile not more than 10 and often not more than 5