Atlantic City Gold Mining District, Fremont County (Google eBook)

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S. A. Bristol, 1914 - Gold mines and mining - 100 pages
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Page 77 - ... Gold in the Sweetwater District was first discovered in 1842 by a Georgian who came here with the American Fur Company for the recovery of his health. After remaining a year he started for home, intending to organize a company and bring them here to work the mines. He never reached his home, however, and was supposed to have been killed by the Indians. Thirteen years elapsed when a party of forty men arrived here. They prospected the whole length of the Sweetwater, found gold everywhere in the...
Page 77 - Indians broke down upon them, robbed them of everything and drove them off. This put a stop to mining operations until the fall of 1866, when a party, led by the same man who led the former expeditions, came down from Virginia City, Montana. They wintered on the Sweetwater, and on July 8th, 1867, the Carissa lode was discovered by H. S.
Page 77 - Winter approaching, they abandoned their enterprise to winter at Fort Laramie, where they intended to provision themselves for a year and get a supply of necessary tools in the spring. This done they started, but when on their way two days they were overtaken by United States dragoons, and brought back to the fort; the leader was sent to prison for some imaginary offense, and the property of the company was confiscated.
Page 77 - Strawberry Gulch. Their rotten sluices, rockers, and toms remain there to the present day. During 1861 mining was abandoned because men could make more money putting up hay and delivering telegraph poles for the Overland Stage Company. In the fall of 1861, however, fifty-two men had collected at South Pass City, ready to commence mining in the early spring of 1862. Their locations were selected and prospects over promising, when, like a thunderbolt, the Shoshoni Indians broke down upon them, robbed...
Page 78 - The news of this success spread rapidly and was greatly exaggerated. A great rush commenced from the neighboring Territories, but the majority of the adventurers, not finding the facts to bear out the reports, left very soon. Only about five hundred remained and went to work. Their labor was well rewarded, and gradually more population was attracted, so that in July, 1869, 2,000 people had settled here.
Page 77 - Their locations were selected and prospects over promising, when, like a thunderbolt, the Shoshone Indians broke down upon them, robbed them of everything and drove them off. This put a stop to mining operations until the fall of 1866, when a party, led by the same man who led the former expeditions, came clown from Virginia City, Montana.
Page 81 - Sweetwater district for the year 1877 must be considered as authoritative. He also reported in a brief way the claims of this gold camp, which is too extended to publish. It resembles very much the report of Surveyor General Reed, only it was made seven years later. Since 1877 until recently this district has been anything "but prosperous. Each year some of the mines would work a small force of men, but most of them have been continuously idle. Occasionally the spell has been broken by some promoter...
Page 79 - ... pyrites, while the country rock consists of gneisses. It will be seen at once that the great value of these ores lies in the ease with which the gold can be extracted. I shall describe these mines more in detail in a subsequent portion of this report and simply allude to them now in their geological relations." The report that followed was simply a reference to the production and country rock of a few lodes. Prof. TB Comstock's report in "Northwestern Wyoming,
Page 80 - ... were discovered in these metamorphics (referring to the rocks of South Pass district), gold was washed out of the gulches and the Sweetwater mines were far-famed for their richness and reported production. Misrepresentation, bad management and unscrupulous speculation ruined what might have become a flourishing mining district. Today the town South Pass presents a dreary appearance. Many, if not the majority, of its houses are deserted and broken window panes, swinging doors, and torn roofs tell...
Page 77 - ... provision themselves for a year and get a supply of necessary tools in the spring. This done they started, but when on their way two days they were overtaken by United States Dragoons and brought back to the fort. The leader was sent to prison for some imaginary offense and the property of the company confiscated. "In 1858 the leader returned to this region but did no mining until 1860 when he and eight others commenced mining on Strawberry gulch.

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