The Life and Letters of Barthold George Niebuhr: With Essays on His Character and Influence, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Chapman and Hall, 1852
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Contents

Justification of his refusal to go into society
48
Algernon Sidney Dictating History of the Revolution
49
The same
50
EUTIN AND THE SOCIETY THERE THE STOLBERG8 THE REVENTLOWS JACOBI MOLTKE
51
LETTERS
52
To Moltke Corruption of the German language by the Thirty Years War Voss Klopstock
55
Relative importance of grammatical studies Wolf Jacobi Becomes Private Secretary to Count Schimmelman Acquaintance with Amelia Belireus
57
RESIDENCE IN COPENHAGEN
61
To Madame Hensler Attachment to Miss Behrens
66
To Moltke Announcing his engagement
68
Position and prospects at Schimmelmans Grouvelle
72
On Moltkes marriage
74
Low moral tone of German poets Decline of literature
76
To his Parents Progress in the study of Persian Plan of going to Constantinople
77
To Madame Hensler Schimmelmans plan for a Government Journal 01
81
Requisites for a Professor of Philology
82
Plans of future lifeAttachment to Amelia Behrens
83
Vindicating himself from the charge of idealising his friends
84
Dangers of the scholars life Mental training of the ancients
85
Revolution of the 18th Fructidor
89
Grouvelle Desaugiers Friendships with foreigners
90
To his Parents Political apprehensions
91
Offer of a Professorship 03
94
To his Father Society in Copenhagen Politics
95
To Amelia Effect of weather upon the spirits
97
To his Parents Souza Introductions in England
98
Visit to Hamburgh
99
EXTRACTS FROM HIS DIARIES VISIT TO HOLSTEIN
100
JOURNEY TO ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND JOURNEY TO ENGLAND ACQUAINTANCE THERE STUDIES IN EDIN BURGH RETURN TO DE...
103
To Amelia The journey
109
Russell RennelL Sir Joseph Banks Want of genius among the English
110
The works of art in London Schonboru
112
The sights of London
113
Effect of the changes of nature upon the mind English political writings
116
The English stage
117
To Moltke The citizens scholars and young men of England Resolutions
118
To Amelia Journey from London to Edinburgh
120
The same
122
Opening Lectures at the University Robinson Hope Home Gregory Mode of life
123
Mr Francis Scott Studies Moorhouse
126
An unpleasant acquaintance The Scotts
129
National character Young men Women
131
Want of intimacy in English friendships and neglect of the training of children
133
His own character
135
Study of philosophy in England
138
English literature
139
Characteristics of the Scotch
140
Plans and anticipations Taylor the Infidel
142
ltUerating people
144
The study of the natural sciences Playfair
145
English reserve
146
Visit to Dr C
147
Journey into the Highlands
149
The same A Scotch farmer Sir John Murray
150
Agricultural class in Scotland
153
Return to Copenhagen
154
Good resolutions
155
OFFICIAL LIFE IN COPENHAGEN MARRIAGE AND SETTLEMENT IN COPENHAGEN STOLBERGS CON VERSION BOMBARDMENT OF C...
157
LETTERS
160
To Madame Hensler Stolbergs conversion Modern Pro testantism
170
State of public affairs Schimmelman
173
Conditions of the Peace Madame de Stael 399
174
To his Parents Departure from Copenhagen
191
To ms ParentsConsoling them under the present calamities
195
PROPOSALS FROM OTHER STATES TAKES AN APPOINTMENT
203
To Stein Steins dismissal Public affairs Lord Hutchinson
209
Negotiations with the Russians Loss of literary leisure
215
PROVISIONAL COMMISSION STEIN SENDS HIM TO NEGOTIATE
224
Dutch 401
225
A learned lady 44
228
Meeting with his father
239
Sismondis Italian Republics Circular Letters Vondel
241
To Madame Hensler Sorrow for Denmark
244
King Louis Napoleon
245
To Moltke On the death of Moltkes second wife
248
To Madame Hensler Political anxieties Countess Moltke
249
Moltke Steins fall His character Approaching crisis
251
To Moltke Consolation under trial His own future
255
To Madame Hensler Intercourse Faith Stein
259
Steins proscription Political doctrines at the present conjuncture
261
To Moltke Steins character Altenstein Retirement from public life Massillons writings Schillers Thirty Years War
262
To Madame Hensler Valckenaer Dutch Poets
266
Visit to his Father Reflections on political events Marjorian
268
Grief at the late events Schill
270
The same
271
Stay at Nutschau Early intercourse between Greece and Rome Mirabeau on Finance Baader
272
Successes of the Tyrolese Villers
275
Journey to Konigsberg Ravages of war Stein
278
State of political feeling Schelling Benvenuto Cellini Davys Discoveries
283
Official appointments Plans
284
To his Father Finance Occupations
286
To Madame HenslerAdvantages of unrestricted commerce
289
Hardenberg Intrigues
291
To his Father Study of Arabic
292
To Madame Hensleb Opposition to intended financial measures
293
The war in France 403
295
PROFESSORSHIP IN BERLIN
297
To Madame Hensler Goethe
311
The Danes History of Rome
319
Schleiermachers views of the ancient philosophers
325
State of public affairs
331
To his Father Salts expedition Condition of the Abyssinians Prospects of England 295
343
To Moltke Society in Berlin Reception of his History
344
Reviewing Plato
348
Letter from Goethe to NiEBimR on receiving the Second
357
To Madame Hensler State of public affairs
363
Prospects of France 405
365
Training for tho army Instances of patriotism General
369
EMPLOYED IN CENTRAL ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL NEGOTIATIONS
376
Retreat after the Battle of Bautzen
387
To Perthes Condition and prospects of Hamburgh Prussian
394
Behaviour of the Russian troops in France Prospects of tho Bourbons
404
Selfishness of the Dutch
409
French literature
410
Aspect of Holland after the war
411
To Perthes Evil of French influence
413
To Madame Hensler Lessons to Crown Prince Aspect of Berlin Relations with France
415
Aspect of Europe Lessons to Crown Prince Humo and Gibbon
416
State of the new Prussian provinces Italy
417
Style and punctuation England in the Middle Ages
418
Congress of Vienna
419
Society in Berlin Illness of his wife
420
Animal Magnetism Apprehensions about the war
421
On the death of his father
422

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Page 353 - Life and Letters' by Chevalier Bunsen I WAS born with an inward discord, the existence of which I can trace back to my earliest childhood; though it was afterward much aggravated by an education ill adapted to my nature, or rather by a mixture of such an education with no education at all. I did not conceal this from you in former days. Had I to choose my own endowments for another life on earth, I would not wish to possess greater facility in taking up impressions from the external world, in retaining...
Page 28 - Persian (of Count Ludolph, the Austrian minister, who was born at Constantinople, and whose father was an acquaintance of mine), and 12. Arabic, he taught himself; in Holland he learnt — 13. Dutch ; and again in Copenhagen — 14. Swedish, and a little Icelandic ; at Memel — 15. Russian; 16. Slavonic; 17. Polish; 18. Bohemian; and, 19. Illyrian. With the addition of Low German, this makes in all twenty languages. Forgive this effusion of my heart concerning my son. I did not mean to boast of...
Page 138 - ... periodicals exist now in multitudes ; but who could say that a third point has been sufficiently attended to — viz., " the ignorance of foreign languages, which prevails both in England and in France : in England the number of those who acquire a smattering of French is very small, and still smaller is the number of those who know enough of German to read a book in that language without considerable trouble
Page 85 - While I am ready to adopt any well-grounded opinion, my inmost heart revolts against receiving the judgments of others respecting persons, and whenever I have done so, I have bitterly repented of it.
Page 187 - ENVY you the recollections of your Italian journey. It is a hard thought to me, that I shall never see the land that was the theatre of deeds with which I may perhaps claim a closer acquaintance than any of my contemporaries. I have studied the Roman history with all the effort of which my mind has been capable in its happiest moments, and believe that I may assume that acquaintance without vanity. This history will also, if I write, form the subject of most of my works. . . . The sight of the works...
Page 179 - I did not tell you) a bombardment that evening : we only reckoned on a delay from the wind, which was high, and against the enemy. It appeared as if the negotiations would come to nothing. While this, and the general flight in the city toward our quarter, and the other less exposed parts, depressed us, and filled us with grief at the fate of our country, even the gloomy turbulence of the elements contributed to our dejection. My heart is heavy with what I have to tell you, or should have, if we could...
Page 175 - ... office to see that the archives were all packed up. On the way, and when there, I heard various reports that two, three, or more English ships had got aground, and that they were firing with such vehemence in order to escape being boarded. Meanwhile, the firing went on with redoubled violence : toward half-past two it quite died away, and only single shots fell from time to time. I went out then to gain intelligence. The streets had become perfectly silent, and only single hollow shots were to...
Page 177 - I cannot tell you anything about them, except that nothing had been decided yesterday, though Nelson himself was on shore. The truce will last at least till to-morrow morning. We must at all events be prepared for a bombardment. The worst is, the Crown batteries can be held no longer, and the enemy will scarcely expose his ships of the line, while he can bombard our docks, fleet, and city.
Page 177 - Thermopyke; but Thermopylae, too, laid Greece open to devastation The appearance of the city [after all was over] was terrible. Every place was desolate; there was nothing to be seen in the streets, but wagons loaded with goods to be carried to some place of safety, a silence as of the grave, faces covered with tears, the full expression of the bleeding wound given us by our defeat.
Page 114 - Upon the occasion of a visit to Westminster Abbey, he says he looked with reverence and gratitude upon the busts of so many great men. •• But how characteristic is the equally honourable position accorded to so many nameless and insignificant persons by the side of the noblest dead ! What a quantity of nonsense...

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Niebuhr, Barthold Georg, 1776-1831 - The life and letters of Barthold George Niebuhr : with essays on his character and influence ...
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