The Talking Eggs: A Folktale from the American South

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Dial Books for Young Readers, 1989 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
59 Reviews
The Talking Egg is adapted from a creole folktale orignally included in a collection of Louisianna stories by the folklorist Alcee Fortier and Published late in the nineteenth century.the Tale appears to have its roots in popular Eupropean fairy tales probably brought to Louisianna by the French emigres.variations of the story,with Cajun or Gullah overtones,suggest that it was gradually spread orally through other areas of the American South.

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This is a fast paced, easy to read book. - LibraryThing
I wasn't particularly in love with the illustrations. - LibraryThing
The plot of the story was very intriguing. - LibraryThing
The story is beautiful and the illustrations gorgeous. - LibraryThing
The illustrations almost seem life-like. - LibraryThing
The artwork was amazing, it fit the text to the t. - LibraryThing
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This book was a great read favorite my son...truelly a favorite of his.. there are many lessons learn, honor your elders no matter what, truth, patience, kindness, follow directions, do not be greedy, and many more

Review: The Talking Eggs

User Review  - Amelia - Goodreads

The Talking Eggs is a brilliant folktale that teaches the value of kindness, honesty and trustworthiness. Blanche, the main character, lives in a small hut with her mother and cruel older sister ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Robert D. San Souci was born in 1946 in San Francisco. After holding jobs in book stores and in publishing, San Souci has been a full-time award-winning children's book author since 1974. San Souci is best known for his adaptations of folklore for children. His first books, The Legend of Scarface and Song of Sedna, were written in 1978 and 1981, respectively. Since then he has written dozens of others. His brother Daniel frequently illustrates his work. The Legend of Scarface won the Notable Children's Trade Book in the Social Studies, National Council for the Social Studies, and was a Horn Book honor list citation. Sukey and the Mermaid won the American Library Association's Notable Book citation in 1992, and Cut from the Same Cloth won an Aesop Award from the Children's Folklore Section of the American Folklore Society. Robert San Souci has also written some nonfiction works for children and several novels for adults.

Acclaimed American artist Jerry Pinkney was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 22, 1939. He began drawing as a four-year-old child, studied commercial art at the Dobbins Vocational School, and received a full scholarship to the Philadelphia Museum College of Art. After graduating, Pinkney worked in design and illustrations, helped found Kaleidoscope Studios, and later opened the Jerry Pinkney Studio. Pinkney is well-known as a children's book illustrator and has created the art for over one hundred titles, including Julius Lester's John Henry, Sam and the Tigers, and The Old African, plus adaptations of Hans Christian Andersen's The Little Match Girl and The Nightingale. He has won five Caldecott Honor Medals, five Coretta Scott King Awards, four Coretta Scott King Honor Awards, four New York Times Best Illustrated Book awards, the Hamilton King Award, and many others. He received the Virginia Hamilton Literary award from Kent State University in 2000, the University of Southern Mississippi Medallion in 2004, and the Original Art's Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society of Illustrators in 2006. Pinkney was awarded the 2009 Caldecott Medal. In addition to holding numerous one-man retrospectives and exhibiting his work in more than one hundred international group shows, Pinkney's art resides in the permanent collections of the Library of Congress, the New York Public Library, the Delaware Art Museum, and the Brandywine River Art Museum. He has taught art at the Pratt Institute, the University of Delaware, and the University of Buffalo.

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