The homes of Shakspere (Google eBook)

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Chapman and Hall, 1847 - 32 pages
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Page 2 - Triumph, my Britain! Thou hast one to show To whom all scenes of Europe homage owe. He was not of an age, but for all time...
Page lv - SINGULAR. A GREAT MAINTAINER OF HOSPITALITY ; GREATLY ESTEEMED OF HER BETTERS ; MISLIKED OF NONE UNLESS OF THE ENVIOUS. WHEN ALL IS SPOKEN THAT CAN BE SAID, A WOMAN SO FURNISHED AND GARNISHED WITH VIRTUE, AS NOT TO BE BETTERED, AND HARDLY TO BE EQUALLED BY ANY. AS SHE LIVED MOST VIRTUOUSLY, SO SHE DYED MOST GODLY. SET DOWN BY HIM THAT BEST DID KNOW WHAT HATH BEEN WRITTEN TO BE TRUE. THOMAS LUCY.
Page ii - He was wont to go to his native country once a year. I think I have been told that he left 200?.
Page iii - There was the shattered stock of the very matchlock, with which Shakespeare shot the deer, on his poaching exploits. There, too, was his tobacco-box; which proves that he was a rival smoker of Sir Walter Raleigh; the sword also with which he played Hamlet; and the identical lantern with which Friar Laurence discovered Romeo and Juliet at the Tomb!
Page lvi - Barn, where, according to the same veracious tradition, the venison was concealed. A word or two disposes of this part of the tradition: Fulbrooke did not come into the possession of the Lucy family till the grandson of Sir Thomas purchased it in the reign of James I.
Page 6 - Costume in England. A HISTORY OF DRESS, from the Earliest Period until the close of the Eighteenth Century ; with a Glossary of Terms for all Articles of Use or Ornament worn about the Person. "By FW FAIRHOLT, FSA With upwards of 600 Engravings, drawn on Wood by the Author.
Page ix - VII. ; and the interior of which was originally decorated with a series of remarkable paintings ; the principal being the legendary history of the Holy Cross. In this chapel, at one time, the school was held ; and an order in the corporation books, dated February 1594, directs " that there shall be no school kept in the chapel from this time following.
Page v - The walls of its squalid chambers are covered with names and inscriptions in every language by pilgrims of all nations, ranks, and conditions, from the prince to the peasant, and present a simple but striking instance of the spontaneous and universal bom \ge of mankind to the great poet of Nature.
Page xlix - I'll slay a doe, while I live. Hold your bow straight and steady : I serve the good Duke of Norfolk. SMUG.
Page i - William Shakspere, then, might have been born at either of his father's copyhold houses, in Greenhill Street, or in Henley Street ; he might have been born at Ingon ; or his father might have occupied one of the two freehold houses in Henley Street at the time of the birth of his eldest son. Tradition says that William Shakspere was born in one of these houses ; tradition points out the very room in which he was born. Let us not disturb the belief.

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