A Treatise of Algebra: In Two Books: the First Treating of the Arithmetical, and the Second of the Geometrical Part. The Second Edition with Additions. By Philip Ronayne, Gent (Google eBook)

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William and John Innys, 1738 - Algebra - 421 pages
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Page 332 - C' (89) (90) (91) (92) (93) 112. In any plane triangle, the sum of any two sides is to their difference as the tangent of half the sum of the opposite angles is to the tangent of half their difference.
Page 300 - The circumference of every circle is supposed to be divided into 360 equal parts called degrees, and each degree into 60 equal parts called minutes, and each minute into 60 equal parts called seconds, and these into thirds, fourths, &c.
Page 30 - Multiply the numerators together for a new numerator, and the denominators together for a new denominator.
Page 330 - Radius, fo the other Sides acquire different Names, which Names are either Sines, Tangents, or Secants, and are to be taken out of your Table, To find a Side, any Side may be made Radius : Then fay, as the Name of the Side given is to the Name of the Side required ; fo is the Side given to the Side required.
Page 6 - ... 1. If equal quantities be added to equal quantities, the sums will be equal. 2. If equal quantities be subtracted from equal quantities, the remainders will be equal. 3. If equal quantities be multiplied by equal quantities, the products will be equal. 4. If equal quantities be divided by equal quantities, the quotients will be equal. 5.
Page 32 - Multiply the numerator of the dividend by the denominator of the divisor, for a numerator; and multiply the denominator of the dividend by the numerator of the divisor, for a denominator 19.
Page 331 - In any triangle, the sides are proportional to the sines of the opposite angles, ie. t abc sin A sin B sin C...
Page 301 - Every plane triangle consists of six parts ; viz., three sides and three angles ; any three of which being given (except the three angles), the other three may be readily found by logarithmical calculation.
Page 465 - ... age. Together with a preface of the temper of mind necessary for the discovery of divine truth, and of the degree of evidence that ought to be expected in divine matters.
Page 301 - Parts, viz. three Sides and three, Angles : Any three of which being given, except the three Angles of a Plane Triangle, the other three may be found either Mechanically, by the help of a Scale of equal Parts and Line of Chords, or by an...

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