From War to Nationalism: China's Turning Point, 1924-1925

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 16, 2003 - History - 388 pages
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Scholars have long recognised that Chinese politics changed fundamentally in 1925, when the radical nationalism of the May Thirtieth Movement took political centre stage. This book explains the connection between the beginning of the Nationalist revolution and the introduction of modern World War I style warfare to China. Its focus is the key year 1924, which saw a regional dispute about the status of Shanghai escalate into a massive civil war. Drawing on a wide range of newly-available archival sources, this book shows how the war of 1924 opened the way for radical nationalism, deeply affecting the Chinese economy, society, politics, and foreign relations. Like the author's well-received first book, The Great Wall of China: From History to Myth, this volume moves easily and persuasively from specifics of strategy and politics to the large and abiding issues of Chinese history and culture.
  

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Contents

China under the Northern System
11
How the wars began
35
Armament and tactics
53
The war in the South
73
The war in the North
91
The war and the economy
119
The war and society
141
The war and the Powers
161
The turning point
181
The collapse of the North
209
1925 Politics in a new key?
241
Conclusion
263
Bibliography
281
Glossary
329
Index
347
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Page xxi - Arthur Waldron, The Great Wall of China: From History to Myth (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990). 40 Loewe, Records of Han Administration, vol. 1, pp. 83-4. 41 Loewe, "The Campaigns of Han Wu-ti,
Page 5 - Warren I. Cohen, America's Response to China: An Interpretative History of Sino-American Relations, second edition (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1980), pp.

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About the author (2003)

Arthur Waldron is Lauder Professor of International Relations at the University of Pennsylvania (1997 to present) and vice president of the International Assessment and Strategy Center (www.strategycenter.net), a nonprofit research organization in Washington, D.C. He is author of or contributor to over twenty books in English and Chinese.

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