Telling The Truth

Front Cover
Touchstone, Sep 17, 1996 - Political Science - 256 pages
2 Reviews
America is in the middle of a vast experiment, says Lynne V. Cheney, testing whether a society can thrive when more and more of its citizens doubt the importance of truth - or even whether such a thing as truth exists. Schoolchildren are being taught that the ancient Egyptians flew in gliders. University students learn that science is a white male conspiracy. In fields ranging from history to law, scholars and practitioners alike argue that their goal is not truth but the advancement of politically useful views.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cyberlibrariannyc - LibraryThing

This is another copiously researched expose recording the perils of political correctness. We cannot change what children learn just because it may be hurtful. Sometimes the truth does hurt. Facts are facts, and sugar-coating them or twisting them around won't change them. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kkirkhoff - LibraryThing

A hard book to read. Cheney was head of the National Endowment for the Humanities, so the book is written from that perspective. It's not so much about "not lying" as it is about how our universities ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
13
One Politics in the Schoolroom
23
Alive and Entrenched
56
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (1996)

Lynne Cheney's most recent book is the New York Times bestseller, We the People: The Story of Our Constitution, illustrated by Greg Harlin. She is also the author of the New York Times bestsellers America: A Patriotic Primer, A is for Abigail: An Almanac of Amazing American Women, When Washington Crossed the Delaware: A Wintertime Story for Young Patriots, A Time for Freedom: What Happened When in America, and Our 50 States: A Family Adventure Across America, and has written a memoir, Blue Skies, No Fences. Mrs. Cheney is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and former chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities. She lives in Washington, D.C., with her husband, Vice President Richard B. Cheney.

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