Ancient Songs and Ballads from the Reign of King Henry the Second to the Revolution (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Reeves and Turner, 1877 - Ballads, English - 436 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

A love song
50
A song on the authors mistress
53
A song setting forth the good effects of the spring
54
A ditty upon the uncertainty of life
56
A song upon the man in the moon
58
A song in praise of sir Piers de Birmingham
60
Azeyn mi wille I take mi leve
65
The death of Robin Lyth
71
The turnament of Tottenham
75
The battle of Otterburn
83
The hontyng of the Cheviat
92
Requiem to the favourites of Henry VI
101
Satire against the Lollards
104
A roundel by dan John Lydgate
110
A roundel on Fortune ill 9 A song on an inconstant mistress ill
111
The contest of the Ivy and the Holly
113
A song in praise of sir Penny
115
Lytyll thanke
117
Wolcum Yol A Christmas carol
120
Carol for saint Stephens day
121
Carol for saint Edmunds day
123
The Recollections of Chatelain in the original French
124
Translation by sir Walter Scott
135
Balet by Anthony Woodvyle earl Rivers
149
Gramercy myn own purse
151
The praise of servingmen or Troly loly
153
Upon the inconstancy of his mistress
155
Invocation to Death
156
A carol on bringing up a boars head to the table on Christmasday
158
In die nativitatis a Christmas carol
160
In die nativitatis Another Christmas carol
161
The kind lady reproaches her defamatory deserter
163
In praise of the joyful life of a bachelor
164
Mutual affection
165
The proffered services of affection
166
I The dying maidens complaint
171
Tye the mare Tom boy
175
In dispraise of women
178
The discontented husband
179
5 Captain Car
180
A mery ballet of the hathorne tre
186
The lamentation of George Mannington
188
The praise of a countrymans life
191

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page lxxxi - The spinsters and the knitters in the sun, And the free maids that weave their thread with bones, Do use to chaunt it : it is silly sooth, And dallies with the innocence of love, Like the old age.
Page 339 - With that there came an arrow keen Out of an English bow, Which struck Earl Douglas to the heart, A deep and deadly blow ; Who never spoke more words than these : Fight on, my merry men all ; For why, my life is at an end, Lord Percy sees my fall.
Page lxxxii - He is dead and gone, lady, He is dead and gone, At his head a grass-green turf, At his heels a stone.
Page 59 - And the LORD said unto Moses, The man shall be surely put to death: all the congregation shall stone him with stones without the camp.
Page 203 - Lay a garland on my hearse, Of the dismal yew; Maidens, willow branches bear; Say I died true: My love was false, but I was firm From my hour of birth. Upon my buried body lie Lightly, gentle earth!
Page 340 - Then leaving life, Earl Percy took The dead man by the hand ; And said, " Earl Douglas, for thy life Would I had lost my land. " O Christ ! my very heart doth bleed With sorrow for thy sake ; For sure, a more redoubted knight Mischance did never take.
Page 338 - Ere thus I will out-braved be, One of us two shall die. I know thee well; an earl thou art, Lord Percy, so am I. " But trust me, Percy, pity it were, And great offence, to kill Any of these our guiltless men, For they have done no ill. "Let thou and I the battle try, And set our men aside."— "Accursed be he," Earl Percy said,
Page lxxxi - When that I was and a little tiny boy, With hey, ho, the wind and the rain; A foolish thing was but a toy, For the rain it raineth every day.
Page 58 - And while the children of Israel were in the wilderness, they found a man that gathered sticks upon the sabbath day.
Page 338 - Then stept a gallant squire forth, Witherington was his name, Who said, I would not have it told To Henry our king for shame, That e'er my captain fought on foot, And I stood looking on. You...

Bibliographic information