A Natural History of Seeing: The Art and Science of Vision

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2007 - Science - 322 pages
9 Reviews
We spend about one-tenth of our waking hours completely blind. Only one percent of what we see is in focus at any one time. There is no direct fossil evidence for the evolution of the eye. In graceful, accessible prose, novelist and science writer Simon Ings sets out to solve these and other mysteries of seeing.

A Natural History of Seeing delves into both the evolution of sight and the evolution of our understanding of sight. It gives us the natural science--the physics of light and the biology of animals and humans alike--while also addressing Leonardo's theories of perception in painting and Homer's confused and strangely limited sense of color. Panoramic in every sense, it reaches back to the first seers (and to ancient beliefs that vision is the product of mysterious optic rays) and forward to the promise of modern experiments in making robots that see.

  

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Review: A Natural History of Seeing: The Art and Science of Vision

User Review  - Khris Sellin - Goodreads

This was a great read, and I really learned a lot. Though there was a lot of scientific/technical jargon in this book that was way beyond me, it really is amazing all that is involved in SEEING. It's ... Read full review

Review: A Natural History of Seeing: The Art and Science of Vision

User Review  - Will - Goodreads

It's a pop science book about how the eye works, how it evolved, and how different scientists discovered more and more about optics and light. It's interesting. Read full review

Contents

III
14
IV
52
V
71
VI
102
VII
128
VIII
154
IX
181
X
211
XI
244
XII
264
XIII
286
XIV
291
XV
299
XVI
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XVII
314
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Simon Ings 's most recent novel is The Weight of Numbers . His science features and interviews have appeared in magazines as diverse as New Scientist , Wired , and Dazed and Confused . Ings lives in London.

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