Songs and ballads (Google eBook)

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M. H. Gill, 1904 - Irish ballads and songs (English) - 160 pages
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Page 25 - Murchadh : and she offered him the delights and the immortality of Fairyland, if he would remain away. But he replied that nothing could induce him to abandon Murchadh in the day of battle, and that he was resolved to go, even to certain death. She then threw a magical cloak around him which made him invisible, warning him that he would certainly be slain if he threw it off. He rushed into the midst of the battle, and fought for some time by the side of Murchadh, making fearful havoc among the Danes....
Page 25 - ... to certain death. She then threw a magical cloak around him, which made him invisible, warning him that he would certainly be slain if he threw it off. He rushed into the midst of the battle and fought for some time by the side of Murrough, making fearful havoc among the Danes. Murrough looked round him on every side, and at last cried out, ' I hear the sound of the blows of Dunlang O'Hartigan, but I cannot see him ! ' Then Dunlang could no longer bear to be hidden from the eyes of Murrough,...
Page 26 - My heart's brimming kisses— I had charmed thee all the evening long With sweet song, Dunlang O'Hartigan ! But when Murrough, Son of Brian, Called thee, youthful lion ! From my kiss and song of tuneful flow Thou wouldst go, Dunlang O'Hartigan. Vain my pleading, prayer, and weeping, To hold thee in keeping! My own cloak to thee I then did yield For thy shield, Dunlang O'Hartigan. On Clontarf's red plain I found thee With that cloak around thee; I alone saw thee like lightning go Through the foe,...
Page 27 - Dunlang O'Hartigan. On Clontarf's red plain I found thee With that cloak around thee; I alone saw thee like lightning go Through the foe, Dunlang O'Hartigan. It was there at brink of even, Murrough cried, sore driven: ' Where is he that loved me lingering nowWhere art thou, Dunlang O'Hartigan!' It was there, when foes were flying, I heard thee replying, Flinging off the cloak that kept thee clear— ' I am here, Dunlang O'Hartigan.
Page 58 - O'Farrell you roved thro' the wildwood ! Ord, the Ring o' the Dawn !— The love of your prime is the love of your childhood — So take him and make him your Bouchaleen Bawn ! Maureen — 'Twas not Shaun O'Farrell I went to meet therein ; Ord, the Ring o...
Page 59 - Oro, the Ring o' the Dawn ! He sings a sweet song, and he writes a kind letter — So take him and make him your Bouchaleen bawn ! MAUREEN I like song and letter, not writer or singer ; Oro, the Ring o...
Page 59 - I'd linger — So find me and bind me my Bouchaleen Bawn ! Cauth— You went to the greenwood to meet Mike O'Malley, Ord, the Ring o' the Dawn ! — Who whistles a jig as he rides down the valley — So take him and make him your Bouchaleen Bawn! Maureen — I'd love him and prove him and hold him forever ; Ord, the Ring o...
Page 61 - Or6, the Ring o' the Dawn ! That cargo is dearest whose journey was farthest, So take him and make him your Bouchaleen bawn ! MAUREEN No tree ever grew but 'twas matched by another ; Oro, the Ring o...
Page 28 - MY heart is sore, loved Donegal, As sore as woman's heart can be ; For, every night, sad voices call Across the angry western sea. I hear in them the waves that plained, The night we left Loch Swilly's shore ; They are moaning — Nuala, Nuala, Ulster is no more ! — Wave on wave moans — Nuala, Nuala, Ulster is no more...
Page 24 - Grip the tall, glittering spear of the hazel-white shaft ! Lift the azure-browed axe of the knotted oak haft ! Bend the pliant yew bow, fit the brassy-nailed dart, Each arrow this morrow must sleep in a heart ! The rats of Athclee be your quarry, Connacians ! Be Laighan's false cravens your prey, ye Milesians ! The steel-feathered Ravens be yours, my Dalcassians, Whom Murrough will lead thro...

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