Long for This World: The Strange Science of Immortality

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Harper Collins, Jun 22, 2010 - Science - 310 pages
23 Reviews

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer Jonathan Weiner comes a fast-paced and astonishing scientific adventure story: has the long-sought secret of eternal youth at last been found?

In recent years, the dream of eternal youth has started to look like more than just a dream. In the twentieth century alone, life expectancy increased by more than thirty years—almost as much time as humans have gained in the whole span of human existence. Today a motley array of scientists, researchers, and entrepreneurs believe that another, bigger leap is at hand—that human immortality is not only possible, but attainable in our own time. Is there genius or folly in the dreams of these charismatic but eccentric thinkers?

In Long for This World, Jonathan Weiner, a natural storyteller and an intrepid reporter with a gift for making cutting-edge science understandable, takes the reader on a whirlwind intellectual quest to find out. From Berkeley to the Bronx, from Cambridge University to Dante's tomb in Ravenna, Weiner meets the leading intellectuals in the field and delves into the mind-blowing science behind the latest research. He traces the centuries-old, fascinating history of the quest for longevity in art, science, and literature, from Gilgamesh to Shakespeare, Doctor Faustus to "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button."

And he tells the dramatic story of how aging could be conquered once and for all, focusing on the ideas of those who believe aging is a curable disease. Chief among them is the extraordinary Aubrey de Grey, a garrulous Englishman who bears more than a passing resemblance to Methuselah (at 969 years, the oldest man in the Bible) and who is perhaps immortality's most radical and engaging true believer.

A rollicking scientific adventure story in the grand manner of Oliver Sacks, Long for This World is science writing of the highest order and with the highest stakes. Could we live forever? And if we could...would we want to?

  

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Review: Long for This World: The Strange Science of Immortality

User Review  - Rebecca - Goodreads

This book was a bit disappointing. how can you write a book about immortality without mentioning Ponce De Leon and his search for the fountain of youth. That being said I have learned that immortality ... Read full review

Review: Long for This World: The Strange Science of Immortality

User Review  - Patrick Francis Louis - Goodreads

Veteran science-writer Jonathan Weiner tackles the strange and under-appreciated field of gerontology in "Long For This World." Gerontology is basically the science of life-extension or in the case of ... Read full review

Contents

TWO The Problem of Mortality
24
THrEE Life and Death ofa Cell
45
FOUr Into the Nest of the Phoenix
71
ii
85
SIx The Garbage Catastrophe
117
SEVEN The Seven Deadly Things
145
EIGHT The Methuselah Wars
175
NINE The Weakest Link
197
TEN Long for This World
223
ELEVEN The Trouble with Immortality
246
TWELVE The Everlasting Yes and No
268
Acknowledgments
283
Index
299
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Jonathan Weiner is one of the most distinguished popular-science writers in the country: his books have won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. His writing has appeared in The New Yorker, Slate, Time, The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, The New Republic, Scientific American, Smithsonian, and many other newspapers and magazines, and he is a former editor at The Sciences. His books include The Beak of the Finch; Time, Love, Memory; and His Brother's Keeper. He lives in New York, where he teaches science writing at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.

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