The Congressional Globe ... (Google eBook)

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Printed at the Globe Office for the editors, 1845 - United States
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Page 117 - It is important, likewise, that the habits of thinking, in a free country, should inspire caution in those intrusted with its administration, to confine themselves within their respective constitutional spheres, avoiding, in the exercise of the powers of one department, to encroach upon another. The spirit of encroachment tends to consolidate the powers of all the departments in one, and thus to create, whatever the form of government, a real despotism.
Page 183 - Canada acceding to this confederation, and joining in the measures of the United States, shall be admitted into and entitled to all the advantages of this union. But no other colony shall be admitted into the same, unless such admission be agreed to by nine states.
Page 171 - ... shall also retain all the vacant and unappropriated lands lying within its limits, to be applied to the payment of the debts and liabilities of said republic of Texas; and the residue of said lands, after discharging said debts and liabilities, to be disposed of as said State may direct; but in no event are said debts and liabilities to become a charge upon the government of the United States.
Page 85 - The inhabitants of the ceded territory shall be incorporated in the Union of the United States, and admitted as soon as possible, according to the principles of the Federal Constitution, to the enjoyment of all the rights, advantages, and immunities of citizens of the United States; and in the meantime they shall be maintained and protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property, and the religion which they profess.
Page 117 - But let there be no change by usurpation; for though this in one instance may be the instrument of good, it is the customary weapon by which free governments are destroyed. The precedent must always greatly overbalance in permanent evil any partial or transient benefit which the use can at any time yield.
Page 130 - Texas, shall retain all the public funds, debts, taxes, and dues of every kind, which may belong to, or be due and owing said Republic ; and shall also retain all the vacant and unappropriated lands lying within its limits...
Page 18 - Petitions, memorials, and other papers addressed to the House, shall be presented by the Speaker, or by a member in his place...
Page 26 - ... place may be supplied by the appointment, as aforesaid, or by the President of the United States, during the recess of the senate, of another commissioner in his stead. The said commissioners shall be...
Page 16 - Second, said State, when admitted into the Union, after ceding to the United States all public edifices, fortifications, barracks, ports and harbors, navy and navy yards, docks, magazines, arms, armaments, and all other property and means pertaining to the public defence, belonging to said Republic of Texas...
Page 72 - ... the general assembly and church of the first-born, whose names are written in heaven...

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