Humane Policy: Or, Justice to the Aborigines of New Settlements Essential to a Due Expenditure of British Money, and to the Best Interests of the Settlers. With Suggestions how to Civilise the Natives by an Improved Administration of Existing Means (Google eBook)

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T. & G. Underwood, 1830 - Aboriginal Australians, Treatment of - 248 pages
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Page xlvii - I am directed by his Excellency the Governor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the...
Page 48 - Negroes who have made, or affect to have made, the laws of the Prophet their peculiar study ; and if I may judge from their harangues, which I frequently attended, I believe that in the forensic qualifications of procrastination and cavil", and the arts of confounding and perplexing a cause, they are not always surpassed by the ablest pleaders in Europe.
Page cvi - ... beasts from them ? There is opportunity enough for it, as they are not strong in number, and very timid ; and since not more than two or three men often graze a thousand cattle close to our cannon, who might be easily cut off, and as we perceive...
Page ccxlviii - And whereas doubts have arisen as to the competency of Hottentots and other free persons of colour to purchase or possess land in this colony : Be it therefore enacted and declared, that all grants, purchases, and transfers of land, or other property whatsoever heretofore made to or by any Hottentot, or other free person of colour, are and shall be, and the same are hereby declared to be, of full force and effect ; and that it is, and shall and may be, lawful for any Hottentot, or other free person...
Page xlviii - He at the same time gave us a number of cattle for our support. He likewise expressed a wish to send two of his chiefs to the Cape, for the purpose of being better acquainted with the English nation, which I have to request your Lordship's permission for doing. We had an opportunity of further gaining...
Page vii - They are nimble people, but very lazy, which probably is for want of commerce. Their chief employment is husbandry. They have a great many bulls and cows, which they carefully look -after; for every man knows his own, though they run all promiscuously together in their savannahs; yet they have pens near their own houses, where they make them gentle, and bring them to the pail. They...
Page civ - To-day the Hottentots came with thousands of cattle and sheep close to our fort, so that their cattle nearly mixed with ours. We feel vexed to see so many fine head of cattle, and not to be able to buy to any considerable extent. If it had been indeed allowed, we had opportunity to-day to deprive them of 10,000...
Page 172 - The original population of the north-eastern frontier must have been veiy considerable, if any credit can be attached to the accounts given by the old inhabitants of the exploits of their younger days. I have heard one man, who is represented as an estimable character in other respects, declare that within a period of six years, the parties under his orders had either killed or taken 3,200 of these unfortunate creatures. Another has stated to me that the actions in which he had been engaged had caused...
Page lvii - ... tails are suspended, as well as from each arm ; round his head is a neat band of fur stuffed, in front of which is placed a tall feather, and on each side a variegated plume. He advanced with his shield, an oval about four feet in length, and an umconto, or spear, when his warriors commenced a war song, and he began his manoeuvres. Chaka is about thirty-eight years of age, upwards of six feet in height, and well proportioned : he is allowed to be the best pedestrian in the country, and, in fact,...
Page lviii - ... many thousands. Chaka's strict discipline and method of attack is such that nothing in their warfare can possibly withstand the attack of the Zulus His warriors in their war-dress are similar to his own ; he differs only in his feather, and they are distinguished in the different divisions by...

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