Bulletin (Google eBook)

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1908 - Meteorology
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 3 - In the case of the temperature this was accomplished by plotting down on a large sheet the monthly normals, drawing a curve through the twelve points representing the months, and then scaling off the temperature for each day. The monthly means were then taken from these values, and in case of any discrepancy between these monthly means and the original monthly normals the curve was slightly adjusted, so that these two monthly means should be in very close agreement. The...
Page 73 - Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July I Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 1 1982 Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June t 1976 1 1977 t 1978 i 1979 l 1980 t 1981 Jan.
Page 1 - The Daily Normal Temperature and the Daily Normal Precipitation of the United States, by FH Bigelow.
Page 77 - Jan | Feb | Mar | Apr | May | June | July 1 Aug | Sept | Oct | Nov I Dec | Annual RAINFALL AT PLYMOUTH, NH Elevation, 500 feet.
Page 3 - ... This contains tables giving the daily normal temperature at 177 stations, and the daily normal precipitation at 175 stations, in the United States. Prof. Bigelow states that the temperature data contained in the report on temperatures and vapour tensions of the United States, reduced to a homogeneous system, gave the values for each month of the year, and generally for the period of 1873 to 1903. In the compiling of the climatological bulletins, which show a variation of the temperature and the...
Page 3 - ... give a true normal value, the curve being generally rough and consisting of broken lines. This is due chiefly to the fact that occasionally the effect of a storm is to produce excessive local precipitation on the given date, but as the occurrence of this storm is more or less accidental at a given place it will require many more years of observations to eliminate this irregularity than we now possess. In order to approximate closely to the daily normal values which would be derived from a very...
Page 3 - ... February 1, etc., on which were entered the values of the precipitation for every tenth day, using all the stations of long record, which covered the map of the United States quite fully. Then the values for each tenth day of the station with short record were compared with those in its neighbourhood, and such adjustments made as seemed to be justified. The daily normals were then interpolated between these 10-day values, in every case being guided by the trend of the corresponding daily normals...
Page 3 - ... daily normals were then interpolated between these 10-day values, in every case being guided by the trend of the corresponding daily normals of the neighbouring stations of long records. These tables of daily normal temperature and precipitation are now in use in the climatological work of the Weather Bureau throughout the United States, and they have superseded all the daily normals which were prepared several years ago from much less extensive data than were available in the formation of these...
Page 3 - ... day of the station with short record were compared with those in its neighbourhood, and such adjustments made as seemed to be justified. The daily normals were then interpolated between these 10-day values, in every case being guided by the trend of the corresponding daily normals of the neighbouring stations of long records. These tables of daily normal temperature and precipitation are now in use in the climatological work of the Weather Bureau throughout the United States, and they have superseded...
Page 122 - Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May. i June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct. NOT. Dec.

Bibliographic information