The Confucian World Observed: A Contemporary Discussion of Confucian Humanism in East Asia (Google eBook)

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Weiming Tu, Milan Hejtmanek, Alan Wachman
University of Hawaii Press, 1992 - Religion - 143 pages
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A workshop sponsored by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1989 brought together more than two dozen scholars in the humanities and social sciences to explore Confucian ethics as a common intellectual discourse in East Asia. The participants included specialists on the societies of China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore as well as scholars who specialize in comparative studies. In nine intensive sessions, they probed the ways in which the Confucian ethic has shaped perceptions of selfhood, dynamics of familial relations, gender construction, social organization, political authority, popular beliefs, and economic culture in East Asia. This book is a distillation of the essence of their multidisciplinary and cross-cultural examination of these issues. It seeks especially to illuminate claims that Confucian ethics have provided the necessary background and a powerful motivation in the rise of industrial East Asia, the most dynamic region of sustained economic growth and political development since World War II.
  

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Contents

AN OVERVIEW
1
THE PROBLEMATIQUE OF THE CONFUCIAN VALUE ORIENTATION
14
CONFUCIAN ETHICS AS A COMMON DISCOURSE
28
CULTURAL IDENTITY AND SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS
39
GENDER AND FAMILY
52
COMMUNITY AND EDUCATION
60
POLITICAL CULTURE AND ECONOMIC ETHICS
74
POPULAR THOUGHT AND RELIGION
91
COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES
107
SUMMARY
123
Glossary
133
Index
139
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Page vii - The hypothesis is that a key variable in explaining the economic performance of these countries is Confucian ethics or post-Confucian ethics, in the sense that the moral values in question are now relatively detached from the Confucian tradition proper and have become more widely diffused.

About the author (1992)

Tu Weiming is Professor of Chinese History and Philosophy at Harvard University.

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