The Federalist papers

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Buccaneer Books, 1992 - History - 483 pages
251 Reviews
This is a new edition of the classic text, the papers of Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison written in support of the then-proposed Constitution of the United States. In addition to the supplementary materials provided (including a copy of the Constitution and an Index of Ideas), this revised edition also contains a new introduction, historical glossary, selected bibliography, the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation.

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Kind of hard to read, but defiantly worth the effort. - Goodreads
Thing is, the writing blows me the F away. - Goodreads
In particular, James Madison was a talented writer. - Goodreads
This is no page turner. - Goodreads
IN BEFORE BURR REFERENCE. - Goodreads

Review: The Federalist Papers

User Review  - Bryan Holmes - Goodreads

The Federalist Papers are one of the key books that every American should read periodically, along with the US Constitution. The papers by Madison, especially, are key to understanding the background ... Read full review

Review: The Federalist Papers

User Review  - Edward Weiner - Goodreads

There is no better way to understand historical events than to read what contemporary writers said about what was happening. Read full review

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About the author (1992)

Alexander Hamilton was born in the West Indies in 1757, the illegitimate child of a Scottish merchant. He came to the American colonies to study at King's College (now Columbia University), and became an early and ardent supporter of the Revolutionary cause. During the Revolutionary War he was aide-de-camp to George Washington and a member of the Continental Congress. He was a leading figure at the Constitutional Convention (1787) and a principal author of The Federalist Papers. At first Secretary of the Treasury he articulated a policy of protection for manufacturing interests, strong central government, and establishment of a national bank. After leaving the Cabinet, he practiced law in New York. His personal attacks hindered the political career of the volatile Aaron Burr, who finally challenged him to a duel in 1804. Hamilton was shot, and died of his wounds.
John Jay (1747-1829) was a conservative lawyer who became a leading patriot. He was a minister to Spain (1780-82), the first Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1789-95), and he negotiated the treaty of 1795 between the U.S. and Britain. His contributions to The Federalist Papers concern foreign affairs.
James Madison was born in 1751, the son of a Virginia planter. He worked for the Revolutionary cause as a member of the Continental Congress and the Virginia House of Delegates. The leader of deliberations at the Constitutional Convention, he fought for the adoption of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Through an ally of Hamilton on the Constitution he was a supporter of Jefferson's agrarian policies. He was Jefferson's Secretary of State (1801-9) and his successor as president (1809-17), but his presidencywas marred by the unpopular War of 1812. Madison died in 1836