The Canadian Law of Banks and Banking: The Clearing House, Currency and Dominion Notes, Bills, Notes, Cheques and Other Negotiable Instruments (Google eBook)

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Canada Law Book Company, 1907 - Banking law - 694 pages
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Contents

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Page 454 - That at the time it was negotiated to him he had no notice of any infirmity in the instrument or defect in the title of the person negotiating it.
Page 632 - Notice of dishonor is not required to be given to an indorser in either of the following cases : 1. Where the drawee is a fictitious person or a person not having capacity to contract, and the indorser was aware of the fact at the time he indorsed the instrument; 2.
Page 450 - But a holder who derives his title through a holder in due course, and who is not himself a party to any fraud or illegality affecting the instrument, has all the rights of such former holder in respect of all parties prior to the latter.
Page 630 - A bill of exchange is an unconditional order in writing, addressed by one person to another, signed by the person giving it, requiring the person to whom it is addressed to pay on demand or at a fixed or determinable future time a sum certain in money to or to the order of a specified person, or to bearer.
Page 444 - Where the instrument contains or a person adds to his signature words indicating that he signs for or on behalf of a principal, or in a representative capacity, he is not liable on the instrument if he was duly authorized; but the mere addition of words describing him as an agent, or as filling a representative character, without disclosing his principal, does not exempt him from personal liability.
Page 488 - Where a bill is addressed to two or more drawees who are not partners, presentment must be made to them all...
Page 447 - A valuable consideration, in the sense of the law, may consist either in some right, interest, profit, or benefit accruing to the one party, or some forbearance, detriment, loss or responsibility given, suffered, or undertaken by the other.
Page 458 - Every holder of a bill Is prima facie deemed to be a holder in due course; but if in an action on a bill it is admitted or proved that the acceptance, issue, or subsequent negotiation of the bill, is affected with fraud, duress, or force and fear, or illegality, the burden of proof is shifted, unless and until the holder proves that, subsequent to the alleged fraud or illegality, value has in good faith been given for the bill.
Page 502 - Delay in making presentment for payment is excused when the delay is caused by circumstances beyond the control of the holder, and not imputable to his default, misconduct, or negligence. When the cause of delay ceases to operate, presentment must be made with reasonable diligence.
Page 418 - ... the delivery may be shown to have been conditional or for a special purpose only and not for the purpose of transferring the property in the instrument.

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