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" But as soon as the critic betrays that he knows more of his author than the author's publications could have told him, as soon as from this more intimate knowledge, elsewhere obtained, ha Avails himself of the slightest trait against the author, his censure... "
Various Views - Page 217
by William Morton Payne - 1902 - 271 pages
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The Lady's magazine (and museum). Improved ser., enlarged

...within its small dimensions. THE MESSIAH. A Poem, in Six Books. By Robert Montgomery. " As soon as a critic betrays that he knows more of his author than the author's publi31 cations could have told him — as soon as, from this more intimate knowledge, elsewhere obtained,...
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The New sporting magazine

1835
...shall just extract it from my journal, into which I entered it at the time. " As soon," says he, " as a critic betrays that he knows more of his author than...obtained, he avails himself of the slightest trait ag-ninst the author, his censure immediately becomes personal injury — and his sarcasms personal...
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The republic of letters, [ed.] by A. Whitelaw

Alexander Whitelaw - 1833
...sprays, leaves, buds, blossoms, and fruits,—their shapes, tastes, and odours. CRITICISM. As soon as a critic betrays that he knows more of his author than...this more intimate knowledge, elsewhere obtained, heavailshimself of the slightest trait against the author, hiscensure immediately becomes personal...
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The Republic of Letters: A Selection, in Poetry and Prose, from ..., Volume 3

Alexander Whitelaw - Literature - 1835
...sprays, leaves, buds, blossoms, and fruits, — their shapes, tastes, and odours. CRITICISM. As soon as a critic betrays that he knows more of his author than...knowledge, elsewhere obtained, he avails himself of the slight est trail against the author, his censure immediately becomes personal injury — his sarcasms...
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The New Sporting Magazine, Volume 9

Hunting - 1835
...which I entered it at the time. " As soon," says he, " as a critic betrays that he knows more of bis author than the author's publications could have told...elsewhere obtained, he avails himself of the slightest trail, ap-ainst the author, his censure immediately becomes personal injury — and his sarcasms personal...
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The works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: prose and verse

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Literary Criticism - 1845 - 546 pages
...that lie knows more j if his author than the author's publications could have told him ; as won a« from this more intimate knowledge, elsewhere obtained,...the slightest trait against the author, his censure inMantly becomes pcn-onal injury, his sarcasms personal insults. He ceases to be a CRITIC, and takes...
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Biographia Literaria, Or, Biographical Sketches of My Literary ..., Volume 2

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1847 - 804 pages
...what effect it is his object to produce ; and with a view to this effect must he weigh his words. But as soon as the critic betrays, that he knows more...him ; as soon as from this more intimate knowledge, else24* I where obtained, he avails himself of the slightest trait against l the author ; his censure...
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Biographia literaria; or, Biographical sketches of my literary life and opinions

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1848
...what effect it is his object to produce ; and with a view to this effect must he weigh his words. But as soon as the critic betrays, that he knows more...him ; as soon as from this more intimate knowledge, else. 24* where obtained, he avails himself of the slightest trait aga/.nst the author ; his censure...
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The works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Literary Criticism - 1849 - 546 pages
...view to this effect must he weigh hie words. But as «oon as the critic betrays that he knows more :i his author than the author's publications could have...elsewhere obtained, he avails himself of the slightest trail against the author, his censure inftamly becomes personal injury, his sarcasms personal insults...
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The complete works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: With an ..., Volume 3

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Greenough Thayer Shedd, Henry Nelson Coleridge, Sara Coleridge Coleridge - Philosophy - 1854
...what effect it is his object to produce ; and with a view to this effect must he weigh his words. But as soon as the critic betrays, that he knows more...this more intimate knowledge, elsewhere obtained, j he avails himself of the slightest trait against the author ; his / censure instantly becomes personal...
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