English Merchants: Memoirs in Illustration of the Progress of British Commerce, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Richard Bentley, 1866 - Merchants - 861 pages
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Page 349 - The increase of our revenue is the subject of our care, as much as our trade ; 'tis that must maintain our force when twenty accidents may interrupt our trade ; 'tis that must make us a nation in India.
Page 350 - ... tis that must make us a nation in India; without that we are but as a great number of interlopers, united by his Majesty's royal charter, fit only to trade where nobody of power thinks it their interest to prevent us; and upon this account it is that the wise Dutch, in all their general advices which we have seen, write ten paragraphs concerning their government, their civil and military policy, warfare, and the increase of their revenue, for one paragraph they write concerning trade...
Page 42 - Your mind is tossing on the ocean There, where your argosies with portly sail, Like signiors and rich burghers of the flood ; Or, as it were, the pageants of the sea Do overpeer the petty traffickers That curt'sy to them, do them reverence, As they fly by them with their woven wings.
Page 312 - ... perfection than a crab : that our melons, our peaches, our figs, our apricots, and cherries, are strangers among us, imported in different ages, and naturalized in our English gardens ; and that they would all degenerate...
Page 28 - I gan me drawn, Where much people I saw for to stand ; One offered me velvet, silk, and lawn, Another he taketh me by the hand, "Here is Paris thread, the finest in the land!
Page 312 - Our tables are stored with spices, and oils, and wines. Our rooms are filled with pyramids of China, and adorned with the workmanship of Japan. Our morning's draught comes to us from the remotest corners of the earth. We repair our bodies by the drugs of America, and repose ourselves under Indian canopies. My friend Sir Andrew calls the vineyards of France our gardens ; the spice-islands, our hot-beds ; the Persians our silk-weavers, and the Chinese our potters.
Page 375 - I looked into the great hall where the bank is kept, and was not a little pleased to see the directors, secretaries, and clerks, with all the other members of that wealthy corporation, ranged in their several stations, according to the parts they act in that just and regular economy.
Page 313 - For these reasons there are not more useful members in a commonwealth than merchants. They knit mankind together in a mutual intercourse of good offices, distribute the gifts of nature, find work for the poor, and wealth to the rich, and magnificence to the great.
Page 28 - And proffered me bread, with ale and wine, Ribs of beef, both fat and full fine. A fair cloth they gan for to spread ; But wanting money I might not there speed.
Page 155 - presently deposit your hundred pounds in gold, or else no going hence all the days of your life. I have been your physician to cure you of your squeasy stomach, and here, as I deserve, I demand my fee for the same.

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