Emerging from Darkness: Studies in the Recovery of Manichaean Sources

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Paul Allan Mirecki, Jason David BeDuhn
BRILL, Dec 31, 1996 - Religion - 294 pages
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Modern interpretation of the Manichaean religious tradition requires a firm foundation in the sober and meticulous reconstruction of highly fragmentary sources. The studies collected in this volume contribute to such a foundation by bringing new primary texts to the public for the first time, extracting new data from previously known sources, and defining and delimiting important but previously neglected sets of material. The studies are authored by an international group of leading scholars in the fields of ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern studies, comparative religion, early Christianity, patristics, art history, Turkic studies and Coptology.
The textual and art historical materials examined possess distinctive histories, character and significance representing the broad geographical range of Manichaeism from Algeria to China. By elucidating these essential remains of the Manichaean religion, the comprehensive treatments contained in Emerging from Darkness provide a provocative picture of Manichaeism as a diverse and productive tradition in a variety of settings and media. The volume will be foundational for future scholarly studies on the sources presented and for studies in Manichaeism and late antique religions in general.
  

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Contents

Magical Spell Manichaean Letter
1
A Manichaean Treatise on Biblical
33
The Turkic Manichaean Literature
89
The Reconstruction of the Manichaean Kephalaia
145
A Progress Report
161
Identifying the Corpus of Manichaean Art among
177
Manichaean Citations from the Prose Refutations of Ephrem
217
Marginal Notes on Manichaeism from an Outsider
289
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About the author (1996)

Paul Mirecki, Th.D. (1986) in Religious Studies, Harvard Divinity School, is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. He is the founding Chair of the Manichaean Studies Group (1988). His publications include a wide variety of studies in ancient Mediterranean religions with a primary focus on Coptic papyrology. Jason BeDuhn, Ph.D. (1995) in Comparative Religion, Indiana University, is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and History at the Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana. He is the Co-Chair of the Manichaean Studies Group. He has published numerous articles on late antique religions with a primary focus on Manichaeism.

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