The Invisible Heart: An Economic Romance (Google eBook)

Front Cover
MIT Press, Feb 22, 2002 - Business & Economics - 282 pages
42 Reviews
A love story that embraces the business and economic issues of the day?The Invisible Heart takes a provocative look at business, economics, and regulation through the eyes of Sam Gordon and Laura Silver, teachers at the exclusive Edwards School in Washington, D.C. Sam lives and breathes capitalism. He thinks that most government regulation is unnecessary or even harmful. He believes that success in business is a virtue. He believes that our humanity flourishes under economic freedom. Laura prefers Wordsworth to the Wall Street Journal. Where Sam sees victors, she sees victims. She wants the government to protect consumers and workers from the excesses of Sam's beloved marketplace.While Sam and Laura argue about how to make the world a better place, a parallel story unfolds across town. Erica Baldwin, the crusading head of a government watchdog agency, tries to bring Charles Krauss, a ruthless CEO, to justice. How are these two dramas connected? Why is Sam under threat of dismissal? Will Erica Baldwin find the evidence she needs? Can Laura love a man with an Adam Smith poster on his wall? The answers in The Invisible Heart give the reader a richer appreciation for how business and the marketplace transform our lives.
  

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Review: The Invisible Heart: An Economic Romance

User Review  - Arielle Pardes - Goodreads

With all the grace of free market enthusiast Adam Smith, Russel Roberts' The Invisible Heart presents lessons of basic economics wrapped up neatly into a love story. While Roberts fails to convince ... Read full review

Review: The Invisible Heart: An Economic Romance

User Review  - Piyush Arora - Goodreads

I want to hang out with the author of this book and ask him a ton of questions. But this book provides an excellent framework for viewing a capitalistic society that has made US what it is, and its ... Read full review

Contents

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Copyright

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Page 1 - By preferring the support of domestic to that of foreign industry, he intends only his own security ; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain, and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention.

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